Ted Cruz Mocks GOP Leaders, Sparks Marathon Weekend Session On … – Huffington Post

WASHINGTON — The Senate is all but guaranteed to pass a $1.1 trillion grab-bag funding bill to keep the government open. But the effort to pass the bill has been fraught with drama, as a simmering feud between Republican leaders and the conservative wing of their party led by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) sparked an unusual weekend voting marathon Saturday.

It all started Friday evening when Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) rejected an offer from Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to push ahead with the funding bill, as well as measures that extend expiring tax breaks and the federally backed terrorism insurance program.

Reid objected because he also wanted to approve about 20 of President Barack Obama’s nominees before the Senate left session.

The resulting arrangement was that the Senate would approve a short stopgap funding bill on Friday, take a break, then finish most remaining business by Monday night, including the controversial funding bill that will keep the government running through September.

McConnell even left the Capitol around 9 p.m,, telling reporters he’d see them Monday.

But soon thereafter, Cruz and Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) headed to the Senate floor and objected, blocking the short stopgap and forcing the chamber into session on Saturday. The two conservative senators are demanding a vote on a point of order, raised by Cruz, that questions the validity of the entire spending bill. The move is an effort to object to President Barack Obama’s executive action sparing up to 5 million undocumented immigrants from deportation.

Cruz questioned whether America should trust McConnell and House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) to follow through on their pledges to fight Obama on immigration. The two leaders convinced their members not to use the funding measure for battles over immigration or the Affordable Care Act. Boehner and McConnell got Republicans to agree to fund most of the government, but leave the Department of Homeland Security with only enough cash to run through February, at which time the leaders promised to challenge Obama’s immigration orders.

“I take them at their word because the alternative would be that elected leaders were saying something to the American people they don’t believe, and they don’t intend to follow through on,” Cruz said during a long floor speech.

But, he added, “I would note that a whole lot of citizens across this country feel a little bit like Charlie Brown with Lucy and the football, where in fight after fight leadership in Congress says, ‘We’ll fight next time — not this time, no, no, no. The wise thing to do is to fight in a month, fight in two months, fight in thee months.”

“There comes a point when Charlie Brown has kicked the football and fallen on his rear end one too many times,” Cruz said.

While Reid had hoped for a break, Lee blocked that plan, saying, “I don’t see any reason why the United States Senate should suspend its operations while the American people are waiting for us to act.”

Ironically, Cruz and Lee’s objections actually sped of the process of passing the funding bill. Without the break, the Senate will hold its final procedural vote on the spending bill around 1 a.m. Sunday, then pass it Monday at about 7 a.m.

Cruz said his goal was to put senators on the record as to whether or not they support Obama’s “illegal amnesty.”

Reid and Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) made sure to highlight Cruz and Lee’s mini-revolt when they opened up Saturday’s vote-a-rama. The Democratic senators noted that Cruz was mostly criticizing members of his own party, the same way he did last year before leading fellow conservatives in a push to defund Obamacare, which resulted in a government shutdown.

“I might just ask the majority leader, this is the same senator who shut down the government last year in protest over the Affordable Care Act?” Durbin asked Reid in a brief colloquy.

“The very same man,” Reid responded. “Now he’s hung up on not only the Affordable Care Act, but the president’s action to give 5 million people relief in this country so they can come out of the shadows and make this country a more productive place.”

The spending bill is also being criticized from the left, with a group of lawmakers led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) complaining about provisions that allow wealthy donors to give even more money to political parties and ease the Dodd-Frank bill’s restrictions on banks making risky trades.

Funding for the government is set to run out at midnight Saturday, but the House of Representatives has already passed a separate measure that authorizes spending until Wednesday. The Senate can pass that whenever it needs to, as long as none of its members object.

Michael McAuliff covers Congress and politics for The Huffington Post. Talk to him on Facebook.

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Growing divide among Senate Republicans on spending bill? – Fox News

sessions senate.jpg

Dec. 12, 2014: Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., talks to reporters on Capitol Hill as the Senate considers a spending bill.

WASHINGTON –  Republican aren’t mincing words about some in their own party as the political divide grows and the deadline to pass a spending bill nears.

Heading into a rare Saturday session, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told Fox News he was surprised that GOP Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah went over his head Friday night and held up a vote on the $1.1 trillion spending bill.

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A senior GOP source lashed out at Cruz and Lee, calling the move “hamfisted” and “amateurish.”

Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid told reporters that he was surprised by Cruz and Lee.

On Friday night, the two Republican lawmakers demanded a vote on a proposal to cut funds from the bill that could be used to implement President Obama’s new immigration policy, ending any chance the measure could clear the Senate and be sent to the White House with a minimum of fuss.

Officials in both parties said the bill remains on track for clearance by early next week. Even so, the move led Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to abandon plans to adjourn the Senate for the weekend, and raised the possibility of a test vote on the spending bill shortly after midnight on Saturday.

Senate Republican leaders have pledged to challenge Obama’s immigration policy early in the new year, after the GOP takes control of the Senate. But Cruz suggested they shouldn’t be entirely trusted to keep their pledge.

“We will learn soon enough if those statements are genuine and sincere,” he said, in a clear reference to Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell and Speaker John Boehner.

Ironically, Cruz and Lee played a major role in events slightly more than a year ago that led to a partial government shutdown — an event McConnell, Boehner and most Republicans have vowed to avoid repeating. This time, Republican officials said they may have inadvertently given Reid an opening to win confirmation for several of Obama’s nominees that might otherwise have languished.

With the end of the two-year Congress approaching, Reid is pressing to confirm about 20 Obama nominees to fill posts such as surgeon general, director of the Social Security Administration and federal judgeships.

The spending measure tops the remaining items on a quarrelsome Congress’ agenda. Others include renewing tax breaks for individuals and businesses and a government program supporting the market for insurance against terrorist acts. In one bit of progress, the Senate sent Obama a sweeping defense policy measure by a big bipartisan vote.

Earlier Friday, the controversial spending package won a personal endorsement from Obama and was brought before the Senate.

Obama acknowledged that the measure has “a bunch of provisions in this bill that I really do not like,” and said the bill flows from “the divided government that the American people voted for.”

Obama has sided with old-school pragmatists in his party like Reid, but he’s split from leading liberals such as House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Warren blasted the measure in a Senate speech for the third straight day, saying it was a payoff to Citigroup, whose lobbyists helped write a provision that significantly weakens new regulations on derivatives trading by Wall Street banks.

“Enough is enough. Washington already works really well for the billionaires and the big corporations and the lawyers and the lobbyists,” Warren said. “But what about the families who lost their homes or their jobs or their retirement savings the last time Citi bet big on derivatives and lost?”

Another provision loathed by many Democrats — though backed by the Democratic National Committee — raises the amount of money that wealthy donors may contribute to political parties for national conventions, election recounts and headquarters buildings.

Democrats will lose control of the Senate in January because of heavy losses in midterm elections last month and will go deeper into a House minority than at any time in nearly 70 years.

Lawmakers from both parties came to the floor to praise the underlying spending measure, which provides funding to keep nearly the entire government operating through the Sept. 30 end of the current budget year.

The sole exception is the Department of Homeland Security, which is funded only until Feb. 27. Republicans intend to try then to force the president to roll back a new immigration policy that removes the threat of deportation from millions of immigrants living in the country illegally.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Thousands March in Washington to Protest Deaths by Police – New York Times

Many of the protesters along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington wore T-shirts that read, “Black Lives Matter” and chanted, “I can’t breathe.”
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER and ELENA SCHNEIDER
December 13, 2014

WASHINGTON — Tens of thousands of Americans marched along the National Mall in Washington on Saturday to protest the deaths of unarmed black men and boys at the hands of the police. The demonstrators — many of them wearing T-shirts that read “Black Lives Matter” and chanting “I can’t breathe” — filed in from the blocks along Pennsylvania Avenue, evoking memories of civil rights marches of past decades as they moved toward the Capitol.

“It’s a matter of honoring the lives we’ve lost,” said one protester from the District of Columbia. “It’s a double-edged sword, I’m proud that we are coming together, but on the other hand I’m sad that we are here, marching for the right to breathe.” She added, “This is not a localized issue; this our country’s issue.”

The march — known for years as the National March Against Police Violence — was led by the National Action Network, the organization run by the Rev. Al Sharpton, and was attended by the families of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Akai Gurley, Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice, all killed by police officers while unarmed. Additional protests were planned Saturday in New York City and around the country.

Police would not estimate how many were marching, but at midday a plaza that could hold 5,000 people, had overflowed. As the march moved toward the Capitol, thousands more demonstrators poured in from side streets to form a mobile mass of puffy coats, strollers, posters and spontaneous prayer groups.

Video Feature | Voices From the ProtestsWith demonstrations planned nationwide this weekend to protest the deaths of black men at the hands of the police, four protesters in New York City outlined their goals and motivations.

“I’m marching for everyone’s sons and daughters,” said Esaw Garner, the widow of Eric Garner, who died in Staten Island when an officer placed him in a chokehold. Samaria Rice, the mother of 12-year-old Tamir, said, “To the police force: Don’t shoot our children. To the all the families who experience the same pain as me: We will have justice.” Her son was shot and killed by a police officer in Cleveland because he was waving a gun that turned out to be a toy that fired plastic pellets.

The march follows protests around the country over recent grand jury decisions not to indict the officer who shot Mr. Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., or the one who placed Mr. Garner in a fatal hold in Staten Island.

On Friday, the death of Tamir, the 12-year-old Cleveland boy, was formally ruled a homicide, according to a county autopsy report; he died in November when an officer shot him within seconds of arriving on the scene.

Protesters have occupied parks, city streets, train stations and retail stores to draw attention to he use of force by police. Thousands of people in New York tried to close major roadways, bridges and tunnels, and disrupt the rhythms of the city. In Berkeley, Calif., an Amtrak train was forced to stop, a central freeway was closed down for hours, and regional commuter trains were halted.

The National Park Service said sponsors of today’s march in Washington, which this year was called Justice for All March, had sought a permit for 5,000 protesters. Many protesters were organized by the American Civil Liberties Union, branches of the N.A.A.C.P. and various labor, civil rights and religious groups.

Protesters gathered at the Freedom Plaza near the National Mall; the march was to end near the Capitol, where Mr. Sharpton was expected to call for congressional hearings into the deaths in New York and Ferguson, and lay out a legislative agenda concerning police conduct. The Justice Department is investigating the deaths in both cities, but the organizers want the department to have broader powers over killings by police officers.

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California Cleans Up As Storm Hits Southwest – CBS Local

CAMARILLO (AP) — Californians are cleaning up Saturday from a major storm that soaked the drought-stricken state before moving east to drop rain on Arizona.

Perhaps the biggest job was in Camarillo, about 50 miles northwest of Los Angeles, where a mudslide made 13 homes uninhabitable Friday. The debris flowed down a hillside burned by wildfire last year.

A rare tornado that briefly touched down in South Los Angeles triggered cleanup efforts.

In Northern California, residents of two trailer parks in Redwood City were bailing floodwaters, while Sonoma County residents were relieved the Russian River didn’t overflow its banks.

More rain is forecast in California starting Sunday in the north and Monday in the south, though the weather isn’t expected to equal the strength of the storm swirling farther east Saturday.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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GOP Angst Over 2016 Led to Provision on Funding – New York Times

It was the team of Speaker John A. Boehner,  center, that first approached Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, with a proposal for a funding accord.
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
December 13, 2014

The secret negotiations that led to one of the most significant expansions of campaign contributions in recent years began with what Republican leaders regarded as an urgent problem: How would they pay for their presidential nominating convention in Cleveland in two years?

The talks ended with a bipartisan agreement between Senate Democrats, led by the majority leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, and House Republicans, led by Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio, that would allow wealthy donors to begin giving more than $1 million every election cycle to each party’s national committees.

The agreement drew intense criticism from both liberal Democrats and Tea Party-aligned Republicans when details of the new limits began circulating last week. It is now headed for likely passage as a rider in a $1.1 trillion spending bill loaded with provisions sought by banks, food industry lobbyists and other special interests. It continued to draw fierce attacks as lawmakers prepared to vote on a final spending bill, even as Democratic leaders privately defended the addition as a necessary compromise to forestall more aggressive efforts by Republicans next year to whittle away at other campaign funding restrictions.

“The Reid-Boehner provision to increase by tenfold the limits on contributions to political parties is excessive and also does not belong on this bill,” said Representative Nita M. Lowey of New York, the top Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee.

It was Mr. Boehner’s team that first approached Mr. Reid’s negotiators with a proposal, according to Republicans and Democrats with knowledge of the discussions.

After successfully pushing legislation in March to abolish public financing for party conventions, some Republicans had become worried about how they would pay for their 2016 convention, scheduled to be held in Cleveland, in Mr. Boehner’s home state, Ohio. Some feared that the party would have to scale back the convention, losing clout and prestige to the big-money outside groups that are playing bigger roles in campaigns.

House Republicans first proposed allowing unlimited contributions to the committees that pay for activities inside the convention hall, including checks from corporations, which have been prohibited from making direct contributions to federal candidates and parties for more than a century. (Businesses and unions can already give to each convention city’s host committees, which are separate, nonprofit organizations that raise money to pay for parties and other amenities outside the actual conventions.) Democrats suggested resurrecting the taxpayer subsidy, a move the Republicans opposed.

“Our overriding concern is that taxpayer money not be used,” said Michael Steel, a spokesman for Mr. Boehner.

Democrats countered with a proposal to allow the Republican and Democratic national committees to establish new convention accounts, capped at $20 million, that could accept larger contributions than currently permitted the parties — but only from individuals. The current provision would allow individuals to write checks for those accounts of up to $97,200 a year, or three times the size of the maximum contribution regularly permitted for the committees.

They also had another concern: real estate. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is currently millions of dollars in debt, not only from the hard-fought midterm campaign, but also from the cost of a $5.2 million mortgage taken out to buy additional office space last spring.

In what appears to be an effort to help alleviate such costs, Democrats demanded that the added provision also allow all party committees, including the House and Senate campaign committees, to solicit additional large contributions to cover the costs of buying, renting or renovating real estate. The Democrats’ campaign committee was not consulted about the request, a spokesman said, nor was its leadership.

“The D.S.C.C. was not involved,” said Justin Barasky, a spokesman for the committee.

Democrats also asked for a third provision that would allow triple the normal amount for contributions, earmarked for legal costs. Republican efforts to place new restrictions on voting in many states, two Democrats said, had helped power a surge in election litigation. The additional provision would allow donors to write a third check, again at triple the normal limit, to “to defray expenses incurred with respect to the preparation for and the conduct of election recounts and contests and other legal proceedings,” according to the bill.

In effect, the new rules whittle away at the restrictions on so-called soft money in the 2002 McCain-Feingold legislation, which prohibited parties from raising large contributions under the guise of funding “party-building” and get-out-the-vote efforts.

All in all, the new accounts would vastly expand the amount that wealthy donors could give to party committees. Under current rules, the most one individual could donate to party committees in a given year totals about $97,200. Should the new budget agreement be signed by President Obama, that amount would skyrocket to $776,600, or $1.56 million over a two-year election cycle.

In a letter to Mr. Obama on Friday, advocates of stricter campaign limits said the proposed changes amounted to “the most corrupting campaign finance provisions ever enacted” and urged him to veto the bill. “In a ‘bipartisan’ unholy alliance, Senator Reid and Senator McConnell joined with House Speaker John Boehner to secretly insert into the Omnibus bill the destructive campaign finance provisions, which were unknown to the public and members of Congress until the day the bill was filed in the House,” the letter stated.

Democrats and Republicans alike said on Friday that even if the new rules bolstered the influence of large donors, they would also improve disclosure and accountability by pushing more donor dollars into party committees, rather than into “super PACs” and other less-regulated outside groups.

Ben Ginsburg, a prominent Republican election lawyer, said the additional money would be a lifeline.

“It will allow the national parties to have more funds to be able to help their candidates and state parties,” said Mr. Ginsburg, “in an era where candidate voices and state party voter mobilization efforts are being drowned out and usurped by outside groups.”

Ashley Parker and Robert Pear contributed reporting from Washington.

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Police arrest suspect in shooting at Portland high school – USA TODAY

Portland police have arrested a 22-year-old man in connection with the shooting at Rosemary Anderson High School. VPC

Video Transcript

Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)
00:03 Police have made an arrest in connection with the shooting
00:05 at Rosemary Anderson high school that left four people injured. Three
00:09 of them remain in the hospital this morning at least squad
00:12 has critical injuries police say they arrested the 22 year old
00:16 man about 1:30 this morning. His name has not been released
00:19 yet police pulled him over at north interstate avenue and going
00:22 street. They do say he had a gun in the car
00:25 shortly after that police served a search warrant at the apartments
00:28 at north killings Warrick and north Vancouver avenue. That’s about five
00:32 blocks east of Rosemary Anderson high school where the shooting happened.
00:35 Three students were in the hospital this morning after that shooting
00:38 a police believe the shooting was gang related. We’re learning more
00:42 about the victims this morning. Seventeen year old liberate Franklin has
00:45 been an outspoken member of the community testifying at Portland City
00:49 Council about the black male initiative. He’s also spoken with senator
00:53 Ron Wyden an intern this past summer in mayor Charlie Hale’s
00:56 office he isn’t fair condition this morning. Along with twenty year
01:01 old David Jackson the day. Sixteen year old Taylor’s embers is
01:04 in critical condition. Another teen is home after being grazed by
01:09 a bullet. Masses who or who. It’s salute. And Augustine or
01:18 Luther sure. The crowd gathered to remember the victims of gun
01:21 violence the event was more timely than ever. It came just
01:24 hours after a shooting outside Rosemary Anderson high school in north
01:27 Portland. Four people between the ages of sixteen and torn were
01:31 hit by the gunfire they ran inside the alternative school to
01:35 escape the danger. Some of the people on the corner actually
01:37 talking today and then. They were responsive. Some advantages like on
01:43 the stomach or on the chest. Prior to the shooting investigators
01:46 believe there was some sort of altercation outside the school. As
01:49 the news of the violence spread family and friends raced to
01:52 the hospital at one point they stepped outside the emergency room
01:56 joined hands and pray. One of the victim I knew I
02:00 just came here that was really can thing you know coming
02:02 at a street in the united believe that this viva I.
02:05 You don’t know what’s going on in here the school a
02:07 lot now. It was most certainly a terrifying afternoon and for
02:10 nobody more so than the students at Rosemary Anderson. Mayor Charlie
02:13 hale sent a message for the shooter. In his accomplices were
02:17 gonna find it and we’re gonna bring you to justice and
02:19 you’re gonna go to jail for a really long time because
02:22 this is a serious crime is heinous crime. Violence against kids
02:26 is the worst kind. People who have lost loved ones to
02:30 climb the crowd at this church tonight we’ll tell you violence
02:33 of any kind is unacceptable. In they won and he’s not.
02:38 Normal. We don’t know yet if a man arrested is the
02:41 shooter not police didn’t have much of it description to go
02:44 on for the suspect they said he was a black male
02:46 in his late teens to early twenties. Witnesses say use with
02:50 two others with the same description. Last seen running eastbound on
02:54 killings worth street.

A 22-year-old man has been arrested by Portland Police Gang Enforcement Team officers in connection to the shooting Friday of four students outside an Oregon high school for at-risk youth.

Early Saturday morning, police pulled over the man’s car and found a handgun in the vehicle, according to the Portland Police Bureau.

At 2 a.m., police served a search warrant related to the shooting investigation at an apartment about 5 blocks away from the school.

As of 10:30 p.m. EST Friday, a 16-year-old girl was hospitalized in critical condition, and two males — ages 17 and 20 — were in serious condition, police said. A fourth person — a 19-year-old woman — was grazed by a bullet but not hospitalized.

The victims were reportedly on their lunch break. They were all affiliated with the school, either as high school students or in job training, according to Portland police Sgt. Pete Simpson.

USA TODAY

4 students shot at Portland high school

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Contributing: Sara Roth, KGW-TV

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/1DrwvNI

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Sharpton to Lead Washington Protest After Police Killings – Bloomberg

(Bloomberg) — Civil-rights advocates are demonstrating today in Washington to protest the killing of black men by police, the latest in a series of rallies across the U.S. that have drawn thousands to the streets.

The event, organized by Al Sharpton, president of the National Action Network and an MSNBC television host, seeks to pressure the federal government to address excessive force by local law-enforcement agencies. Buses were set to bring marchers from as far as Connecticut and Florida.

Deadly police encounters have inflamed anger over what activists call inequities in the criminal justice system. Looting and arson followed a Missouri grand jury’s decision Nov. 24 not to indict a white police officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager. Nine days later, another round of demonstrations began after a white policeman avoided indictment after choking a black man to death on New York’s Staten Island. Transportation has been snarled by protesters in sporadic events in major cities since then.

“African-American lives and Latino men’s lives, they mean nothing,” said Marques-Aquil Lewis, 27, a minister and aide to Ras Baraka, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, who is traveling with about 60 others to Washington. “I want to see an end to violence period, when it comes to police brutality, or black-on-black crime, or the injustice in the legal system.”

Molotov Cocktails

The public outcry began after the St. Louis County grand jury declined to bring criminal charges against Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. While Wilson said the shooting was justified because he was under assault, shops were looted and a dozen buildings were set aflame as police cars burned on the street and protesters hurled rocks, bottles and Molotov cocktails. Wilson resigned in response to threats to police related to his continued employment.

A New York panel decided Dec. 3 not to charge Daniel Pantaleo with the homicide of Eric Garner, a 43-year-old father of six whose death while being held in a chokehold was recorded on video. The next day, a report by the U.S. Justice Department faulted Cleveland police for a pattern of using excessive force that violated civil-rights law.

Most of the protests since last month’s riots in Ferguson have been peaceful. Demonstrators marching in near-freezing temperatures have taken over automobile lanes of the Lincoln Tunnel, Brooklyn Bridge and West Side Highway in New York as well as Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. Marchers stood outside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Dec. 8 for a basketball game attended by Prince William and his wife, Kate Middleton.

Presidential Panel

President Barack Obama has convened a panel to address the distrust of police among minorities, and said he would ask Congress to fund a community-policing package that would help supply as many as 50,000 body-worn cameras for officers. The Justice Department is also investigating the incidents in Ferguson and Staten Island.

Among the marchers in Washington today will be family members of Garner and Brown, as well as relatives of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old boy shot Nov. 22 by a Cleveland police officer, and of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen who was killed by a neighborhood watchman in 2012, according to organizers.

Sharpton, a New York-based activist, said the lack of prosecutions demonstrates the need for Congress to give federal authorities more power to step in. While the Justice Department can bring charges under civil-rights law, Attorney General Eric Holder said last month that there is a “high legal bar” for such cases.

Pressure Congress

“You’ve got to be able to move the jurisdictional threshold, which Congress can do,” Sharpton said during a Dec. 7 appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “Otherwise, we will be back here again.”

Jacky Johnson, a spokeswoman for the National Action Network, said organizers weren’t sure how many people would gather in Washington. Sean Conboy, a spokesman for the city’s police department, said the department also had no estimates. A separate rally is also being held in New York.

Phyllis Coley, the publisher of Spectacular Magazine, a Durham, North Carolina, publication targeted at black readers, said she organized buses to bring more than 100 people to Washington. She said the demonstration is needed to keep a focus on race and pressure Congress to act on Obama’s plans.

“There is a race problem and it needs to be discussed,” said Coley, who said her son was frequently pulled over by police as a teenager while driving to visit wealthy white friends on his lacrosse team. “Change has to be made from the top down. We need to send a message to our legislators.”

Racial Gaps

While racial attitudes have shifted since the civil-rights battles of the 1960s, other gaps remain. In income, economic mobility, housing, education, employment and life expectancy blacks lag behind whites, according to the U.S. Census Bureau and data compiled by Bloomberg. Young black males were also 21 times more likely than their white counterparts to be fatally shot by police, according to an analysis of federally-collected data on shootings from 2010 to 2012 by ProPublica, the news site.

William Trent, a mall manager from Bowie, Maryland, who was planning to attend the Washington rally with his 27-year-old son, said he’s hopeful that the march may motivate a new generation of civil-rights activists to mobilize.

“What usually happens is the day of the march, everybody is gung ho to do something — then it gets held up, the ball gets dropped, and we tend to forget,” he said. “I’m going in the hope that this march will be different.”

For Related News and Information: Protests Spread Across U.S. as Thousands Take to NYC Streets Sharpton Convenes Civil-Rights Meeting on Chokehold Ruling U.S. Plans Civil-Rights Probe of NYC Police Chokehold Death Top Stories: TOP

To contact the reporter on this story: William Selway in Washington at wselway@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Stephen Merelman at smerelman@bloomberg.net Alan Goldstein, Jeffrey Taylor

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Killingsworth shooting: Police arrest 22-year-old man, seize handgun – OregonLive.com

Police arrested a 22-year-old man early Saturday morning in connection with the Friday afternoon shooting that wounded four people outside Rosemary Anderson High School.

Sgt. Pete Simpson, a spokesman for the Portland Police Bureau said the man was arrested in a car at North Interstate Avenue and Going Street at 1:30 a.m. A handgun was seized during the arrest.

At 2 a.m., Simpson said, members of the bureau’s special emergency response team served a search warrant at an apartment in the 200 block of North Killingsworth Street as part of the investigation.

The apartment is just 5 blocks from where the shooting took place just after noon Friday outside the alternative high school.

Simpson said the name of the man who was arrested will be released after he has been booked into the Justice Center Jail.

Check back for updates.

— Stuart Tomlinson

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Senate likely to vote on spending bill Monday; holds rare Saturday session to … – Fox News

sessions senate.jpg

Dec. 12, 2014: Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., talks to reporters on Capitol Hill as the Senate considers a spending bill.

WASHINGTON –  The Senate will convene in a rare Saturday session after making some progress toward passing a $1.1 trillion bill to fund the government Friday night. Despite the step forward, lawmakers failed to lock down a deal after two Republican senators demanded the bill be stripped of money that could be used to implement President Obama’s new immigration policy.

Senate GOP leaders pledged to fight Obama’s immigration plan next year when they take control of the upper chamber but Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, suggested they shouldn’t be entirely trusted to keep their pledge.

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“We will learn soon enough if those statements are genuine and sincere,” Cruz said, in a clear reference to Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker John Boehner.

Still, current leaders from both parties say the bill remains on track for a Monday vote.

On Friday, the House passed a second stopgap measure Friday afternoon, buying the Senate additional time to discuss and vote on a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill. 

The House vote provides a pad to make certain the government doesn’t shut down at midnight Saturday when current funding authority runs out.

It’s still unknown whether the House measure, passed by a voice vote while the chamber was virtually empty, will be needed. Senate leaders say they hope to wrap up action on the omnibus budget bill by Friday night but say that goal is looking less attainable.

Washington woke up to “Fallout Friday,” with liberal Democrats openly outraged at Obama and conservative Republicans disgusted with Boehner after both did enough wheeling, dealing and arm twisting to push through a spending bill three hours shy of the midnight deadline.

The surprise beneficiary in this latest political conundrum could be Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., a relative newcomer to the Senate but looking more and more like the liberal Democratic answer to who might challenge Hillary Clinton for the party’s 2016 presidential nomination.

The House narrowly approved a sweeping spending bill Thursday night despite deep misgivings among liberals and conservatives alike, sending the measure to the Senate as lawmakers averted a partial government shutdown.

The bill passed on a 219-206 vote, following an intense lobbying effort by House Republican leaders and the White House.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram, Kara Rowland and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Clouds fill Grand Canyon in rare weather event – SFGate

Updated 1:44 pm, Friday, December 12, 2014

Photo: Michael Quinn, AP

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Photo: Michael Quinn, AP In this photo provided by the National Park Service, visitors to Mather Point on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, in Ariz., view a rare weather phenomenon – a sea of thick clouds filling the canyon just below the rim, Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. The total cloud inversion is expected to hang inside the canyon throughout Thursday. Cory Mottice of the National Weather Service said the weather event happens about once every several years, though the landmark was treated to one last year.

In this photo provided by the National Park Service, visitors to…

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Photo: Maci MacPherson, AP This photo provided by the National Park Service shows dense clouds at the south rim of the Grand Canyon on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014 in Arizona. A rare weather phenomenon on Thursday had visitors looking out to a sea of thick clouds. The total cloud inversion is expected to hang over the Grand Canyon just below the rim throughout the day. —–

This photo provided by the National Park Service shows dense clouds…

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Photo: Maci MacPherson, AP This photo provided by the National Park Service shows dense clouds at the south rim of the Grand Canyon on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014 in Arizona. A rare weather phenomenon on Thursday had visitors looking out to a sea of thick clouds. The total cloud inversion is expected to hang over the Grand Canyon just below the rim throughout the day. —–

This photo provided by the National Park Service shows dense clouds…

Clouds fill Grand Canyon in rare weather event

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GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. (AP) — A rare weather phenomenon at the Grand Canyon had visitors looking out on a sea of thick clouds just below the rim.

The total cloud inversion was expected to hang inside the canyon throughout Thursday.

Cory Mottice of the National Weather Service says the weather event happens about once every several years, though the landmark was treated to one last year.

The fog that has been shrouding parts of northern Arizona is courtesy of recent rains. Mottice says the fog is able to stick around and built up in the Grand Canyon overnight when there is no wind.

With an inversion, the clouds are forced down by warm air and unable to rise.

Mottice says the Grand Canyon gradually will clear up in the coming days.

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