The Finance 202: Some corporate interests swiftly align against tax overhaul – Washington Post

THE TICKER

Want to keep smart and easy tabs on the tax reform debate in Washington? We have you covered here.

House Republicans have finally released their tax package today. But an unusual array of corporate interests — which typically ally with Republicans in major legislative battles — are siding against it in what could be an ominous development.

The prominent naysayers include the National Association of Realtors and the National Federation of Independent Businesses, which immediately said they couldn’t support the overhaul that makes changes to both the individual and corporate side of the tax code. The National Association of Home Builders had already announced it’s opposition and vowed to fight the revamp with its considerable firepower. “We will do everything we can to defeat this thing,” said Jerry Howard, chief executive of the National Association of Home Builders, even before the plan made its debut to House Republicans this morning.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce praised the release of the bill, but said in a statement that “a lot of work needs to be done.” And The BUILD Coalition — which represents financial services companies, real-estate developers, and farm interests — has come out against the bill’s proposed limitation of the deduction for interest on business debt.

#NFIB is unable to support #tax bill in current form. Our full statement: https://t.co/3bNQr6FEIq#taxreform

— NFIB (@NFIB) November 2, 2017

The biggest problem for Republicans appears to be the decision to halve — rather than keep entirely intact — the deduction for mortgage interest. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would reduce that deduction to homeowners with $500,000 mortgages instead of the $1 million mortgages that are currently allowed. Property tax deductions would now be capped at $10,000.

Moderate Republicans from high-cost states like New York and New Jersey had fiercely opposed any changes to the state-and-local tax deduction and early reports had thought the final product would potentially eliminate it. But that was not the case, provoking opposition from them as well.

Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.) is apparently one of the foes, per a Fox News reporter:

GOP NY Rep Zeldin: I am a No to this bill in its current form. We need to fix this State and Local Tax deduction issue.

— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) November 2, 2017

The overhaul would slash the corporate tax rate from 35 to 20 percent — a bid pushed by President Trump in order, he hopes, to lure American companies back into the country. It would collapse the individual side of the code from seven brackets to four.

Other major proposals in the bill include, per Mike and Damian:

  • Doubling the standard deduction from $12,700 per family to $24,000.
  • Creating a new “family credit” and raise the child tax credit from $1,000 to $1,600 per child.
  • Eliminating deductions for medical expenses and and property and casualty losses were eliminated.
  • Changing the way college-savings plans and tax-exempt churches and charities are taxed.

Yet Republican leaders proclaimed their members “excited” about the effort:

Democrats, not so much:

The initial pushback is not a good sign for Republicans desperate to obtain a legislative win as they head into the 2018 midterms.

Much haggling and negotiations remain to occur — and reports of the plan’s death, which will come with some frequency, are likely to be exaggerated. Nonetheless, the instant backlash suggests this will be an uphill battle.

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MARKET MOVERS

The rental truck used by Sayfullo Saipov, an Uzbek immigrant, who drove down a bike path for twenty blocks killing eight people and injuring several more, is hauled away on a New York City Police flatbed on Wednesday. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

NEW YORK TERROR ATTACK: 

Charges filedNYT: “Federal prosecutors on Wednesday filed charges accusing the driver in the Manhattan truck attack of carrying out a long-planned plot, spurred by Islamic State propaganda videos, to kill people celebrating Halloween. The charges, filed just over 24 hours after the deadliest terror attack on New York City since Sept. 11, 2001, placed the case in the civilian courts even as President Trump denounced the American criminal justice system as ‘a joke’ and ‘a laughingstock.’ The charges describe the driver, Sayfullo Saipov, 29, as a voracious consumer and meticulous student of ISIS propaganda, and detail how he said he was spurred to attack by an ISIS video questioning the killing of Muslims in Iraq.”

Trump dispatched with the presumption of innocence late Wednesday to declare that Saipov should get the death penalty: 

NYC terrorist was happy as he asked to hang ISIS flag in his hospital room. He killed 8 people, badly injured 12. SHOULD GET DEATH PENALTY!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 2, 2017

That followed a day in which Trump used the attack to renew a push for his hard-line policies. David Nakamura and Ed O’Keefe: “The president said he would move to eliminate a popular “diversity lottery” for foreigners seeking U.S. visas and direct the State Department to ramp up “extreme vetting” of immigrants. He also suggested he would consider sending the suspect, Sayfullo Saipov, a legal permanent resident of the United States, to the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.”

Terror by truck. The method is now a go-to for ISIS, used seven times in Western cities over the last year. The Post: “The results of the Halloween attack underscore the reasons for its popularity, terrorism experts say: The tactic requires no special skill or instruction, or formal membership in a terrorist group. And it is nearly impossible to prevent or stop.” … Neighbors say they saw Saipov practice driving a truck around his suburban New Jersey neighborhood in recent weeks. 

FED WATCH: 

Jerome Powell. (Zach Gibson / Bloomberg)

Powell gets the rose. The announcement is coming today. WSJ offers some historical perspective: “Mr. Powell’s nomination would mark the first time in nearly four decades that a new president hasn’t asked the serving Fed leader to stay on for another term, even though that person was nominated by a president of a different party. The last time a first-term president didn’t do that was in 1978, when President Jimmy Carter chose G. William Miller to succeed Arthur Burns… Reached by phone Wednesday, both Mr. Powell and Ms. Yellen declined to comment. A Fed spokeswoman also declined to comment.” 

Investors cheer continuity. Bloomberg’s Sarah Ponczek and Elena Popina: “Investors enjoying the fruits of a decade-long bull market in equities expect to find an ally in Jerome Powell… Barring the reappointment of Yellen, Powell was viewed as one of the best options for bulls, an extension of the dovish policies that helped the S&P 500 rise 45 percent during her tenure… Equities have been on an upswing since Bloomberg News reported Trump was leaning toward Powell on Friday, with the biggest exchange-traded fund rising three of four days. S&P 500 Index futures were little changed late Wednesday after the Wall Street Journal earlier reported that Trump intends to nominate the 64-year-old Fed governor on Thursday. The dollar and Treasuries showed little reaction.”

Fed leaves rates alone. In the shadow of Thursday’s big announcement, the central bank on Wednesday left interest rates unchanged. WSJ’s David Harrison: “Officials have penciled in one more move for 2017 if the economy stays on track. The Fed has one more meeting scheduled before the end of the year, on Dec. 12-13. The central bank has raised its benchmark federal-funds rate four times since late 2015, in quarter-percentage-point steps, to a current range between 1% and 1.25%.”

The former Goldman Sachs president, now Trump’s top economic adviser, was a front-runner for the Fed job until August, when he publicly broke with the president over his handling of fatal neo-Nazi violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Politico

Goldman Sachs economists on Wednesday upgraded their forecast on U.S. nonfarm payrolls for October to a 340,000 increase from a 325,000 gain, based on the latest data on company hiring from ADP and factory activity from the Institute for Supply Management.

Reuters

MONEY ON THE HILL

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Tex.). (Alex Wong/Getty)

TAX FLY-AROUND:

Today’s remainning schedule for the tax bill. Courtesy of Speaker Paul Ryan’s (R-Wis.) press office: 

  • 1:30 pm: Speaker Ryan/Ways and Means members meet with President Trump at the White House.
  • 2:30 pm: Speaker Ryan interview with Fox News’ The Daily Briefing with Dana Perino airs.

More GOP infighting ahead. Bloomberg’s Anna Edgerton: “A leading House Republican conservative warned that the unveiling of the tax bill Thursday would unleash dissent ‘like you’ve never seen.’ But that doesn’t mean Republicans will fail, said Representative Mark Meadows, chairman of the House Freedom Caucus. ‘It may be a little messy, it may not be as fun as we would all have liked to have seen it be over the past few weeks,’ Meadows told reporters Wednesday after meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. ‘But we’re going to get it done, and failure is not an option.'”

Trump throws a curveball. Damian: “Trump on Wednesday said congressional Republicans should make a major change to their upcoming tax cut bill by including changes to the Affordable Care Act, an idea that has divided the GOP for months. The idea had already been rejected one day earlier by… Brady, who had said it risked bogging down the process. But Trump, in two Twitter posts Wednesday, pushed the idea, which has gained currency with some Senate Republicans. The biggest proponent of the idea is Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.).”

Wouldn’t it be great to Repeal the very unfair and unpopular Individual Mandate in ObamaCare and use those savings for further Tax Cuts…..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 1, 2017

….for the Middle Class. The House and Senate should consider ASAP as the process of final approval moves along. Push Biggest Tax Cuts EVER

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 1, 2017

Mnuchin resists corporate fade-in. Bloomberg’s Saleha Mohsin  and Jennifer Jacobs: “Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is resisting a gradual phase in of the proposed 20 percent corporate rate out of concern the move wouldn’t boost economic growth as much as he’s anticipated, according to a Trump administration official and another person familiar with Mnuchin’s thinking. Mnuchin is worried that a slow reduction of the corporate rate from its current 35 percent would also make the U.S. less competitive, as other countries cut their rates faster and foreigners delay their investments in the U.S., said the official, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private.”

He’s got history on his side, a new analysis suggests. “Ladling out corporate tax cuts bit by bit is a bad idea. Look at history,” Bloomberg’s Sarah Ponczek writes. “So goes an argument being pushed by analysts at Strategas Research Partners, who say Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush came to regret their gradualist approaches in 1981 and 2001. ‘Phasing in the corporate tax rate cut for five years is a terrible idea,’ the analysts, led by Daniel Clifton, head of policy research at Strategas, wrote in a note Tuesday. ‘Taxpayers will delay their economic activity in anticipation of the lower tax rate in future years.'”

Colleges, charities on Senate menu. Politico’s Brian Faler: “Universities, charities, life insurance companies and others could all lose cherished tax breaks under a Senate plan to rewrite the tax code. Senate Republicans are considering a number of sure-to-be controversial changes, including imposing a new 2 percent excise tax on the endowment earnings of private universities, according to a summary POLITICO obtained.

They may reduce the tax breaks people receive for fringe benefits at work, such as a deductions for entertainment- and transportation-related expenses. Another proposal, apparently aimed at Silicon Valley firms, would limit write-offs businesses can take for providing meals to employees. Uber drivers, people who rent their homes through Airbnb and others participating in the ‘gig economy’ could see tougher income reporting requirements that make it harder for them to avoid paying taxes. Insurance companies could lose a host of tax breaks worth more than $31 billion.”

WH blasé about delay. Politico’s Nancy Cook reports that the administration was okay with the fact that House Republicans missed their initial target of a Wednesday rollout, “provided it doesn’t extend into the weekend, according to three senior administration officials—and Trump even told Ryan he’d be fine if it takes until Friday, said two people briefed on their conversation.” 

But Trump wouldn’t be accepting responsibility if another of his priorities goes down. Here he was Wednesday making clear he will blame Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn if the tax overhaul fails:

Cut, cut, cut. ABC News: “Ryan’s office initially asked the White House for input because of the president’s knack for branding, according to a senior Hill aide. Trump has been insistent that the bill be called the ‘Cut Cut Cut Act’ according to the administration officials. Ryan and Brady have pushed back on the name of the bill. However, Trump has held firm.”

— A new $100 million force. Politico’s Alex Isenstadt: “Trump’s super PAC is drawing up plans to spend $100 million on an all-out push to sell tax reform and elect pro-Trump Republicans in 2018. The group, dubbed America First Action, is expected to host a fundraiser in the coming months that will be attended by Vice President Mike Pence and is in talks with the administration to get Trump to headline an event. It has tapped oil and gas mogul Harold Hamm, a Trump ally whose net worth exceeds $11 billion, to boost its fundraising campaign. And it is recruiting major Republican Party donors across the country.

Last week, America First officials met with top Trump advisers at the White House to brief them on a multimillion dollar campaign to promote tax reform and discuss how the legislative battle is likely to play out. But the stepped-up activity, which strategists revealed in interviews for the first time, is an abrupt change for the super PAC. The group has been dormant for much of the year, much to the frustration of the White House. America First has suffered from infighting, leadership shake-ups, and questions over its strategy and approach since its founding after the 2016 election.”

Former Rep. Scott Garrett (R-N.J.). (AP /Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Garrett’s rough day. WSJ’s Andrew Ackerman: “Trump’s choice to head the Export-Import Bank didn’t appear to sway waffling Republican senators on a key panel into supporting him, putting his confirmation at risk. Lawmakers from both parties criticized Scott Garrett during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Wednesday, saying his past votes to shut down the bank while serving in the House made him unsuitable to run the agency.

Mr. Garrett reversed his prior opposition to the agency in testimony before the committee, pledging to keep the bank ‘fully functioning.’ But lawmakers indicated they weren’t satisfied by his remarks. No Democrats on the committee are expected to back Mr. Garrett, meaning attracting enough Republican support is crucial to getting his nomination through the panel and advancing it to the full Senate. Industry groups that benefit from the Ex-Im Bank, which provides financing for U.S. exports, are pressuring lawmakers to oppose Mr. Garrett.

‘What would have made you change your mind about whether or not the Export-Import Bank should exist?’ asked Sen. Mike Rounds (R., S.D.) who said he had met with Mr. Garrett twice and hadn’t received a satisfactory answer. ‘This is critical, that you be able to share what has changed your mind.’… Mr. Scott bantered with Mr. Garrett during the hearing but later told reporters he was still undecided.”

TRUMP TRACKER

President Trump. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

RUSSIA WATCH: 

Trump isn’t angry. He says so himself. The NYT’s Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker: “Trump projected an air of calm on Wednesday after charges against his former campaign chief and a foreign policy aide roiled Washington, insisting to The New York Times that he was not ‘angry at anybody’ and that investigations into his campaign’s links to Russia had not come near him personally. ‘I’m not under investigation, as you know,’ Mr. Trump said in a brief telephone call late Wednesday afternoon. Pointing to the indictment of his former campaign chief, Paul Manafort, the president said, ‘And even if you look at that, there’s not even a mention of Trump in there.’ ‘It has nothing to do with us,’ Mr. Trump said.  He also pushed back against a report published Monday night by The Washington Post, which the president said described him as ‘angry at everybody.’ ‘I’m actually not angry at anybody,’ Mr. Trump told The Times.”

He might be a little bit angry. Vanity Fair’s Gabriel Sherman: “Trump… has reacted to the deteriorating situation by lashing out on Twitter and venting in private to friends. He’s frustrated that the investigation seems to have no end in sight. ‘Trump wants to be critical of Mueller,’ one person who’s been briefed on Trump’s thinking says. ‘He thinks it’s unfair criticism. Clinton hasn’t gotten anything like this. And what about Tony Podesta? Trump is like, When is that going to end?’ 

According to two sources, Trump has complained to advisers about his legal team for letting the Mueller probe progress this far. Speaking to Steve Bannon on Tuesday, Trump blamed Jared Kushner for his role in decisions, specifically the firings of Mike Flynn and James Comey, that led to Mueller’s appointment, according to a source briefed on the call.

When Roger Stone recently told Trump that Kushner was giving him bad political advice, Trump agreed, according to someone familiar with the conversation. ‘Jared is the worst political adviser in the White House in modern history,’ Nunberg said. ‘I’m only saying publicly what everyone says behind the scenes at Fox News, in conservative media, and the Senate and Congress.'”

Tech giants face more Hill heat. The Post: “Senators from both parties took tech company officials to task in a hearing Wednesday for failing to better identify, defuse and investigate Russia’s campaign to manipulate American voters over social media during the 2016 presidential campaign. In the second of three Capitol Hill hearings this week on Russian’s online information operation, members of the Senate intelligence committee challenged Facebook, Google and Twitter in strikingly direct terms that, at times, seemed to carry the implicit threat of legislation that could rein in the nation’s wildly profitable technology industry.

‘I don’t think you get it,’ said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), whose home state includes all three companies. ‘What we’re talking about is a cataclysmic change. What we’re talking about is the beginning of cyber-warfare. What we’re talking about is a major foreign power with sophistication and ability to involve themselves in a presidential election and sow conflict and discontent all over this country. We are not going to go away gentlemen. And this is a very big deal.'”

Watch the summary of tech companies’ Senate Intelligence testimony, in three minutes:

One message senators delivered repeatedly to the lawyers sent to represent the companies: Next time, bring your CEOs

The day wasn’t all bad for Facebook, at least. The company posted a 79 percent surge in profit to $4.7 billion, beating Wall Street expectations. 

THE REGULATORS

The Securities and Exchange Commission took a first step on Wednesday to head off the recent trend of celebrities endorsing new virtual currencies, warning that they could be breaking laws.

NYT

CHART TOPPER

Here’s an example of what Russian Facebook ads you might have seen if you were a Hillary Clinton supporter. The Post’s Dan Keating, Kevin Schaul and Leslie Shapiro take a look at a few other examples of how people were targeted on Facebook based on interests, political leanings, location, age and other traits.

DAYBOOK

POST PROGRAMMING ALERT: The Post and Live Nation will bring the “Can He Do That?” podcast to a live audience at the Warner Theatre on Tuesday, Nov. 7. In this live taping, political reporters Bob Woodward, David Fahrenthold and Karen Tumulty will join host Allison Michaels to review the past year in President Trump’s White House and the biggest moments that made people wonder “Can He Do That?” Tickets can be purchased now at Live Nation. Attendees will also receive a free 30-day digital subscription to The Washington Post. 

Today

Coming Up

  • The Heritage Foundation holds an event on reforming the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority on Friday.

  • The House Financial Services Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities and Investment holds a hearing on “Legislative Proposals to Improve Small Businesses’ and Communities’ Access to Capital” on Friday.

  • The Washington Examiner holds an event on the tax bill with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) on Nov. 8.

THE FUNNIES

From the New Yorker:

BULL SESSION

Here are the ads that Russian-linked groups posted on social media:

Donald Trump Jr.’s Halloween socialism lesson, according to the Internet:

Hillary Clinton chats with Trevor Noah on The Daily Show:

[embedded content]

Samantha Bee says chief of staff John Kelly is not the adult in the White House:

[embedded content]

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There’s a Void in the Great Pyramid at Giza, but It May Not Be So Mysterious – New York Times

The Great Pyramid of Giza has towered over Egypt for more than 4,500 years. Built during the reign of Pharaoh Khufu, the monument was a testament to the ruler’s architectural prowess and is thought to have been a home for his mummified remains.

For centuries, archaeologists have ventured into the Pyramid of Khufu, as it is also known, and marveled at the King’s chamber, the Queen’s chamber and the Grand Gallery. Now, using a technique from the field of particle physics, an international team of researchers has harnessed cosmic ray collisions to peek inside and uncover a hidden “void” within the pyramid’s stones that is roughly 100 feet long, similar to the Statue of Liberty from her heel to her head .

“We don’t know if it’s a chamber, a tunnel, a big gallery or things like that,” said Mehdi Tayoubi, co-director of the ScanPyramids project, which published the finding Thursday in the journal Nature. “We have chosen the word ‘void’ and nothing else because we don’t know what this void is.”

Many archaeologists questioned whether the study offered any new information about the ancient Egyptians, and were quick to note that the team most likely did not find a hidden room filled with the pharaoh’s riches. They said the so-called void was probably empty space designed by the pyramid’s architects to lessen the weight on its chambers and prevent them from collapsing, an example of features that were already documented in the construction of the ancient monuments.

However, the study may suggest that advances in technology can offer a richer understanding of wonders of the ancient world that have long fascinated the human imagination.

Khufu, also known by his Greek name Cheops, is thought to have ruled from 2509 B.C. to 2483 B.C., during Egypt’s fourth dynasty. Though he constructed the largest pyramid Egypt has ever seen, the only intact three-dimensional figure of him that archaeologists have found measures a mere three inches tall. Very little is known about him, so his pyramid offers one of the few looks into his life and reign. The site at Giza where his pyramid was built also contains two other major pyramids and the Sphinx.

Since 2015, Dr. Tayoubi and his colleagues, now consisting of three separate teams of physicists and engineers, have investigated the pyramid using a particle physics technique known as muon-tomography to see through to its core.

“We tried to do for the pyramid what a doctor can do with X-rays,” Dr. Tayoubi said.

Instead of X-rays, the team used muons, the heavy cousins of electrons that form when cosmic rays from outer space collide with particles in Earth’s atmosphere. The fallout from the collisions creates a constant bombardment of harmless particles that can penetrate deep into the planet. As the muons pass through matter they lose energy and decay, so if the team detected a small amount of muons, that means they were passing through matter. But if they detected more muons, it suggests the particles were passing through empty space or less dense material.

The technology was previously used by Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Prize winning physicist, to investigate whether there were hidden chambers in the Pyramid of Khafre in the 1960s. As muon detector resolution has greatly improved over the decades, it has since been used to see the inner structures of volcanos as well as the irradiated Fukushima nuclear reactor.

In 2016, Dr. Tayoubi’s colleagues stood in the Queen’s chamber and used muon detectors capable of making improved measurements to study particles as they passed through the pyramid. When they analyzed their data from a region above the Grand Gallery, a long inclined passageway that leads to the King’s Chamber, they found something strange: an unexpected excess of muons.

They found a void.

The first measurements were made by researchers from Nagoya University in Japan who were a part of the project. Then two more teams associated with ScanPyramids, one from France and another from Japan, also confirmed the anomaly with muon tomography, even from outside the pyramid. The discovery comes on the footsteps of the team’s previous work which detected a small void behind the north face of the pyramid in 2016.

Christopher Morris, a physicist who conducts research using muon tomography at Los Alamos National Laboratory and was not involved in the study, called the findings “pretty amazing,” adding that all the team needed to do was set up their muon detectors and reap the rewards.

“All the other physicists who could have done it, and didn’t, are jealous,” he said.

Arturo Menchaca-Rocha a physicist from the National Autonomous University of Mexico who has used muon detection to investigate the Pyramid of the Sun in Mexico, echoed Dr. Morris’s sentiments and said the project’s physics supported its claims.

But archaeologists were more critical of the work.

Mark Lehner, an Egyptologist from the Ancient Egypt Research Associates, said that previous work had shown that the ancient Egyptians most likely constructed gaps in their pyramids and that the voids the team found are nothing special, or new.

“The great pyramid of Khufu is more Swiss cheese than cheddar,” he said. He added that the steep incline of the void also casts doubts on whether it was some sort of room. “At that angle, it doesn’t make much sense for it to be a chamber that would contain artifacts, burials and objects and that sort of thing.”

Zahi Hawass, an Egyptologist, former Egyptian government minister and head of the scientific committee appointed by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities to review the work, was more critical of the finding.

“They found nothing,” said Dr. Hawass, noting that such construction gaps had been known of for at least two decades. “This paper offers nothing to Egyptology. Zero.”

Both Dr. Lehner and Dr. Hawass agreed that the scanning work should continue in hopes that the teams can retrieve higher resolution data about the inner workings of the pyramid, specifically the shape and size of the anomaly.

Hany Helal, who is also co-director of the ScanPyramids project, responded to the criticism saying that from an engineering perspective, it would not make sense to have such a big void above the Gallery if its purpose was to relieve pressure.

He said the next steps are to have an international discussion with archaeologists to figure out the structure’s purpose. In the future, he added that scientists may use drones to explore the void once they have more information about it.

“We are sure there is a void,” he said. “Now let us continue our research.”

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Investigators probe New York attack suspect’s communications while Trump calls for death penalty – Washington Post

Investigators continued Thursday to probe the 29-year-old Uzbek immigrant charged with the New York truck attack, poring over his communications to see if he had any help or guidance before carrying out his deadly rampage, while President Trump publicly weighed in on the federal prosecution of the suspect.

New York police officials say the attacker appears to have radicalized himself online and that it does not appear anyone else was involved, though they said that continues to be a key question in the international investigation launched after the Halloween attack in Lower Manhattan killed eight people and wounded a dozen others.

Federal authorities charged Sayfullo Saipov, the suspected attacker, with providing support to a terrorist organization, saying that he was inspired by the Islamic State to carry out the rampage. The militant group, also known as ISIS, has urged its supporters to use vehicles for attacks.

[ Before the New York attack: Practicing turns in a truck and watching ISIS videos ]

In the charging document, filed Wednesday, authorities said Saipov planned for a year to carry out an attack in the United States and ultimately chose Halloween because he believed more people would be outside as potential targets.

The federal prosecution against Saipov was just hours old when a potentially complicating factor emerged in the form of a presidential tweet. Since the attack, Trump has publicly criticized the American criminal justice system and weighed sending Saipov to the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay.

In messages posted on Twitter late Wednesday and early Thursday, Trump twice called for Saipov to get the death penalty, while also abandoning the Guantanamo Bay idea.

“Would love to send the NYC terrorist to Guantanamo but statistically that process takes much longer than going through the Federal system,” Trump wrote early Thursday. He continued: “There is also something appropriate about keeping him in the home of the horrible crime he committed. Should move fast. DEATH PENALTY!”

Trump’s comments, much like remarks he made about Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, could create a hurdle in the federal case. While one of the charges against Saipov — one count of violence and destruction of a motor vehicle — could carry with it a possible death sentence, the Justice Department has not yet said whether it will seek that penalty. If prosecutors do pursue a rare federal death sentence against Saipov, defense attorneys could argue that Trump’s tweets may prevent a jury from giving the suspect a fair trial.

[ Old friends from Argentina reunited in New York. Five died together in a terrorist attack. ]

The remarks from Trump broke from the tradition that presidents and other senior officials refrain from commenting on ongoing cases in ways that could complicate proceedings, though he is not the first commander in chief to do so. In 2009, then-President Barack Obama weighed in on the case against Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and suggested he would get the death penalty; Obama then backtracked and said he did not mean to prejudge the case.

In a statement released before Trump’s comments, David Patton, Saipov’s attorney, said: “In a case like this involving so much tragedy, it’s more important than ever to let the judicial process play out. How we as a society treat Mr. Saipov will say more about us than it will about him.”

At a speech Thursday in New York City that was scheduled before the truck attack, Attorney General Jeff Sessions highlighted the work federal prosecutors have done bringing cases against terrorism suspects in federal court.

He noted particularly the recent conviction of Ahmad Khan Rahimi, who set off bombs in New York and New Jersey last year; the recent unsealing of charges against three men who plotted to bomb the New York City subway and Times Square; and the apprehension of Mustafa al-Imam, a Libyan national charged with participating in the 2012 Benghazi attacks.

The remarks, in some ways, seemed to be a subtle hint to the president that terror suspects can face justice in American courts. But Sessions, a vocal supporter of using the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, also made mention of the facility there.

“Terrorists should know: this Administration will use all lawful tools at our disposal, including prosecution in Article III courts and at Guantanamo Bay,” Sessions said, according to a prepared copy of his remarks. “If anyone has any doubt about that, they can ask the more than 500 criminals whom the Department of Justice has convicted of terrorism-related offenses since 9/11. And they can ask the dozens of enemy combatants in Guantanamo Bay.”

[ Trump seizes on N.Y. attack to push immigration and vetting policies ]

Sessions, who attended a roll call Thursday with officers, also heaped praise on the New York City Police Department, in particular the officer who shot and wounded Saipov.

The attorney general has had a strained relationship with New York City’s leaders, and in April declared that gang murders there were the “predictable consequence of the city’s ‘soft on crime’ stance.” Sessions’s remarks drew pushback from New York officials, as have some of Trump’s comments.

Trump, in one of his tweets about the New York attack, cited one of the most incendiary parts of the criminal complaint filed against Saipov. Authorities said that Saipov told them he felt good about what he had done and, while speaking to investigators, “requested to display ISIS’s flag in his hospital room.”

Investigators on Wednesday at the scene of the attack. (Mark Lennihan/AP)

In the criminal complaint, the FBI described what Saipov said in his Manhattan hospital room, depicting him as a man who had reams of Islamic State propaganda on his phones and carefully plotted what he was doing.

Saipov told agents he wanted to kill as many people as he could, court papers state, and he considered putting Islamic State flags at the front and back of his truck before deciding that would draw too much attention.

Authorities said Saipov told them that while he first decided a year ago to carry out an attack in the United States — the country where he moved in 2010 on a diversity visa and became a legal permanent resident — he only decided to use a truck two months before.

[ A reconstruction of the New York City truck attack ]

Saipov rented one on the week before the attack to practice making turns with it, authorities said. A neighbor said he thought it was suspicious that Saipov was driving an apparently empty truck in recent weeks near their homes in New Jersey.

Police say that on Tuesday afternoon, Saipov drove a truck onto the bike path along the west side of Manhattan and targeted cyclists and pedestrians as he careened south. Among those Saipov is accused of killing were a group of childhood friends from Argentina, now in their late 40s, who had been planning a trip to New York for years; a young mother; and two men in their 20s and 30s from New York and New Jersey.

Saipov told authorities he was particularly inspired by a video capturing Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi asking Muslims in the United States what they were doing to respond to the killing of other members of their faith in Iraq, the complaint states.

Officials have said that Saipov apparently became radicalized online after he came to the United States. He “appears to have followed almost exactly to a T the instructions that ISIS has put out in its social media channels” laying out guidance for carrying out an attack, according to John Miller, the deputy commissioner of intelligence and counterterrorism at the New York City Police Department.

Among other things, officials say Saipov used a rented truck, had brought knives and a stun gun as additional weapons and left behind notes declaring his allegiance. According to court papers, one note, written in Arabic, could be translated in part to read: “Islamic Supplication. It will endure.”

[ For ISIS followers, terror by truck is now the default choice and the hardest to stop ]

As the Islamic State has suffered battlefield losses and seen its self-declared caliphate shrink, terrorism by vehicle has become the attack of choice for the group’s adherents and supporters in other areas. The tactic has been used, with deadly results, in France, Britain, Germany, Sweden, Spain and Canada.

Investigators are still exploring whether anyone else had any knowledge of or aided in the New York plot. The FBI said briefly on Wednesday it was seeking another man — 32-year-old Mukhammadzoir Kadirov, or Muhammad Kadirov — in connection with the investigation. The bureau gave no indication why they were seeking him and, minutes later, reversed course, saying they had found him but providing no further details.

A person who was in touch with both Saipov’s and Kadirov’s families on Wednesday said that Kadirov is in New Jersey, has retained an attorney and is cooperating with law enforcement officials, but that he was not under arrest as of Wednesday evening. The person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject, said Kadirov is Saipov’s cousin and seemed “utterly shocked and horrified” by what Saipov had done.

The rampage on Tuesday afternoon ended when Saipov crashed into a school bus and emerged from his truck armed with a paintball gun and pellet gun, police said. A passer-by flagged down police officers responding to an unrelated call at a school in the area, and one of them shot and wounded Saipov, police said.

Authorities also said Saipov intended to continue his attack beyond the bike path. He told investigators he intended to keep going to the Brooklyn Bridge to kill even more people, the complaint states, but was apparently unable to after crashing the truck.

Eli Rosenberg and Abigail Hauslohner in Paterson, N.J.; Renae Merle in New York; and Devlin Barrett, Sari Horwitz, Julie Tate, Philip Rucker, Amy B Wang and Samantha Schmidt in Washington contributed to this report.

Read more:

The last bicycle ride of Darren Drake, a young American killed in the New York terrorist attack

Belgian woman killed in New York terrorist attack was ‘the most beautiful mom’

A reconstruction of the New York City truck attack

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Trump Abandons Idea of Sending Terrorism Suspect to Guantánamo – New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Thursday backed off his threat to send the suspect in this week’s New York terrorist attack to the American military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, but once again called for the man to be executed, a public intervention in the case that could come back to haunt prosecutors in any future trial.

In response to questions from reporters, Mr. Trump on Wednesday had said he would be open to transferring Sayfullo Saipov, the immigrant from Uzbekistan charged with plowing a pickup truck into passers-by in Manhattan, from the civilian justice system to the military system at Guantánamo. “Send him to Gitmo, I would certainly consider that, yes,” he said.

But after his offhand and unscripted remark, aides sought to walk back the idea, saying it was merely notional. And the president was evidently briefed or saw something on television afterward about how the civilian courts have been more effective at convicting terrorism suspects than the troubled military tribunal system installed after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The Run-Up

The podcast that makes sense of the most delirious stretch of the 2016 campaign.

The argument that Mr. Saipov should be tried in the same place where the terrorist attack that killed eight was committed mirrored the contention that President Barack Obama’s administration made when it sought to put Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, on trial in a civilian court in New York. But an uproar among city officials and business leaders at the time forced Mr. Obama’s Justice Department to abandon the plan and keep Mr. Mohammed at Guantánamo.

Mr. Trump’s call for capital punishment for Mr. Saipov, however, introduced a surprise complication that may burden prosecutors and help defense attorneys. Mr. Trump first broached the subject in a Twitter message posted shortly before midnight on Wednesday evening.

Presidents are typically advised never to publicly weigh in on pending criminal cases. Such comments can be used by defense attorneys to argue that their clients cannot get a fair trial — especially when the head of the executive branch that will prosecute a case advocates the ultimate punishment before a judge has heard a single shred of evidence at trial.

But Mr. Trump is not one for cautious detachment, and he has disregarded such advice before. Just this week, a military judge said he would consider similar comments by Mr. Trump as evidence in favor of a lighter sentence for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who pleaded guilty to desertion and endangering fellow troops by walking away from his post in Afghanistan, where he was later captured and held prisoner by the Taliban for five years.

Other presidents have been criticized for offering public verdicts about pending criminal cases. In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon declared that Charles Manson “was guilty, directly or indirectly, of eight murders without reason” in the middle of his trial in the killings of the actress Sharon Tate and others.

By the end of the day, the Manson team’s lawyers had moved for a mistrial, citing the president’s remarks, and Nixon issued what his press secretary called a “clarification” taking them back.

“The last thing I would do is prejudice the legal rights of any person, in any circumstances,” Nixon said. The defendant later held up in court a newspaper with the headline “Manson Guilty, Nixon Declares.” But the judge allowed the trial to proceed, ultimately ending with a conviction.

In 2005, President George W. Bush expressed his confidence that Representative Tom DeLay of Texas, the former Republican majority leader, would be acquitted, weeks before his trial on money laundering charges was to open. “I hope that he will, ’cause I like him, and plus, when he’s over there, we get our votes through the House,” Mr. Bush told a television interviewer.

His successor, Mr. Obama, forecast an execution for Mr. Mohammed, the Sept. 11 detainee. Defending the later-aborted decision to try Mr. Mohammed in civilian court rather than a military tribunal, Mr. Obama said critics would not find it “offensive at all when he’s convicted and when the death penalty is applied to him.”

The impact of such comments is more pronounced in military justice cases since the president is commander in chief of the judges and juries that determine guilt or innocence and hand down sentences.

Responding to a wave of sexual harassment allegations in the military, Mr. Obama declared in 2013 that troops who commit sexual assault should be “prosecuted, stripped of their positions, court martialed, fired, dishonorably discharged.” In this instance, he was not commenting on a particular defendant, but attorneys nonetheless argued that it constituted “unlawful command influence.”

Such influence refers to actions by commanders that could be seen as an attempt to sway a court-martial. Defense lawyers in multiple cases cited Mr. Obama’s words. In one case in South Carolina, a judge noted the command influence issue in dismissing sexual assault charges against an Army officer. In another in Hawaii, a Navy judge decided that two defendants could not be punitively discharged because of the president’s comments.

Mr. Trump has more than once offered strong words about people suspected of major crimes. He called the man who opened fire on a concert in Las Vegas last month a “very sick man” and “a very demented person,” but since the man was killed, there will be no trial to influence. On Wednesday, he called Mr. Saipov “this animal.”

Mr. Trump was unflinchingly vocal about Sergeant Bergdahl as a candidate, calling him a “dirty rotten traitor” who should be executed. A military judge in February called the comments “disturbing and disappointing,” but decided since they were made when Mr. Trump was a private citizen, not the president, they did not constitute undue command influence.

Mr. Trump was more restrained when asked about Sergeant Bergdahl’s case last month, but not so much that it did not come up in court. “I can’t comment on Bowe Bergdahl,” Mr. Trump told reporters in the Rose Garden. “But I think people have heard my comments in the past.”

After concerns were raised about the “but” in his comment, the White House sought to mitigate any possible damage with a statement. “The president expects all military personnel who are involved in any way in the military justice process to exercise their independent professional judgment, consistent with applicable laws and regulations,” the statement said.

Col. Jeffery R. Nance, the Army judge presiding over the case, rejected a request that he dismiss the case or limit the potential sentence because of Mr. Trump’s remarks, saying he had not been influenced. But he indicated that he would weigh the president’s comments before determining punishment. “I will consider the president’s comments as mitigation evidence as I arrive at an appropriate sentence,” he said.

Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

Follow Peter Baker on Twitter: @peterbakernyt.

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At least three dead in shooting inside suburban Denver Walmart – Reuters

THORNTON, Colo. (Reuters) – At least three people were killed in a shooting inside a Walmart store on Wednesday in suburban Denver, where police said they had not yet taken anyone into custody.

Walmart employees and shoppers leave the scene of a shooting at a Walmart in Thornton, Colorado November 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Police in Thornton, Colorado, did not immediately release any information about the circumstances of the shooting or who was responsible for the gunfire.

Two men were killed in the shooting. A women, who was injured in the shooting, was taken to a hospital where she later died, Thornton Police Department said on Twitter.

“Detectives currently reviewing security footage & witnesses being interviewed for assistance with suspect(s),” police said on Twitter.

No one had been taken into custody, police said.

The situation appeared potentially ominous from authorities’ initial reports.

“We’ve got multiple parties down, we’re still trying to ascertain what their conditions are,” Officer Victor Avila of the Thornton Police Department told Reuters by telephone not long after police arrived on the scene.

About an hour after the initial alert, police said on Twitter that the threat of gunfire had ended at the store, which was surrounded by police and fire crews.

A woman walks past an ambulance near the scene of a shooting at a Walmart in Thornton, Colorado November 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

“At this time this is NOT an active shooter. Active crime scene. We will update as info becomes available,” the police department said in that tweet. Confirmation of the two fatalities came about 20 minutes later.

Thornton is city of about 120,000 people roughly 10 miles (16 km) northeast of downtown Denver.

Slideshow (14 Images)

Avila said police were called to the store at about 6:30 p.m. Mountain time (8:30 p.m. ET) and that the gunshots had ceased by the time the first officers arrived at the scene.

A Walmart customer, Aaron Stephens, 44, of Thorton, told Reuters he was inside paying for groceries at a self-checkout stand when he heard gunshots and the sound of ricocheting bullets.

“The employees started screaming and the customers started screaming” as people began to flee the store, he recounted. “I ran out, too, because I didn’t want to get shot.”

Stephens said he did not see where the shooting had come from and did not see anyone struck by bullets.

Local NBC television affiliate 9NEWS reported that a woman whose son was in the Walmart had told her that he had heard about 30 gunshots and was still inside.

A video posted on Twitter showed the Walmart, which is situated in a large complex of big-box stores and other retail outlets adjacent to U.S. Interstate 25, apparently empty except for police officers with guns drawn.

Reporting by Keith Coffman in Thornton and Dan Whitcomb and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; Writing by Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Sandra Maler and Michael Perry

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New York terror suspect wanted ISIS flag in hospital, documents show – CNN

Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov, 29, did not say much at his initial court appearance, which he attended in a wheelchair after police shot him.
But a criminal complaint alleges he provided authorities with details on how he planned the attack for months and his commitment to the ISIS playbook.
He had about 90 videos on his cellphone, many of them on ISIS propaganda, according to the complaint.
The details, which emerged Wednesday, painted a picture of a man who allegedly planned more carnage in addition to the eight people killed and about a dozen wounded.
He allegedly picked Halloween to carry out the deadliest attack in New York since September 11, 2001, because he believed more people would be on the streets for the holiday, according to the criminal complaint.
A sketch shows Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov during his first court appearance in New York on Wednesday.A sketch shows Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov during his first court appearance in New York on Wednesday.
Saipov was charged with federal terrorism offenses in Tuesday’s attack. Hours after his first court appearance, in which he entered no plea, President Donald Trump said he should be executed.
“NYC terrorist was happy as he asked to hang ISIS flag in his hospital room. He killed 8 people, badly injured 12. SHOULD GET DEATH PENALTY!’ the President tweeted late Wednesday night.

Suspect’s plans

After his arrest, Saipov told investigators who talked to him a at Bellevue Hospital that he planned Tuesday’s attack for about a year. Two months ago, he said, he decided to use a truck “to inflict maximum damage against civilians,” the complaint states.
Who is New York terror suspect Sayfullo Saipov?Who is New York terror suspect Sayfullo Saipov?
On October 22, he rented a truck from a store — previously identified as Home Depot — in Passaic, New Jersey, to practice making turns ahead of the attack, according to the complaint.
On Tuesday, he went to the same store and rented the truck for two hours. He “had no intention of ever returning it,” the complaint said.
He planned to use the truck to hit pedestrians in the area where he carried out the attack and “then proceed to the Brooklyn Bridge to continue to strike pedestrians,” it said.
“Saipov wanted to kill as many people as he could,” the complaint states.

Inspired by ISIS

During an interview with investigators, Saipov asked to hang an ISIS flag in his hospital room and said “he felt good about what he had done,” the complaint states.
At some point, Saipov considered displaying ISIS flags in the front or back of the truck he used during the attack, but decided against it to avoid drawing attention to himself, he told investigators.
7 new details from the New York truck attack investigation7 new details from the New York truck attack investigation
Authorities did not find any flags near the truck, but they found a handwritten note in Arabic expressing affinity for ISIS.
“The gist of the note was the Islamic State would endure forever,” said John Miller, the deputy commissioner for intelligence and counterterrorism for the New York Police Department.
While ISIS has not made any claim of responsibility for the attack, Saipov told investigators he was inspired by ISIS videos, in particular one that shows ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi questioning “what Muslims in the United States and elsewhere were doing to respond to the killing of Muslims in Iraq,” the complaint says.
Law enforcement also found approximately 90 videos and 3,800 images that appeared to be ISIS-related propaganda in one of Saipov’s cellphones, according to the document.
The videos include graphic scenes of ISIS fighters killing prisoners, beheadings, and “instructions for how to make a homemade improvised explosive device,” the complaint says.
He has also been linked to social media accounts that contain ISIS-related material, a law enforcement official said.
And Saipov’s tactic of turning an ordinary vehicle into a lethal weapon is familiar to groups like ISIS.
In 2014, an ISIS spokesman called for lone-wolf attacks using improvised weapons such as knives, rocks, poison and cars.

The charges

Saipov faces federal terrorism offenses, authorities said.
He is charged with providing material support to ISIS, violence and destruction of motor vehicles, said Joon H. Kim, the acting US Attorney for the Southern District of New York .
Saipov appeared in federal court in a wheelchair and didn’t enter a plea Wednesday, a source at the US Attorney’s Office told CNN.

CNN’s Emanuella Grinberg and David Shortell contributed to this report.

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World Series 2017 Game 7 RECAP, score and stats | Houston Astros vs. Los Angeles Dodgers (11/1/17) – NJ.com

With the best of seven series tied 3-3, the Houston Astros met the Los Angeles Dodgers in the deciding Game 7 of Major League Baseball’s 2017 World Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, November 1, 2017 (11/1/17).

Check the scoreboard above for the final score and click on the stats link for game stats.

App users: For the best mobile experience, use the mobile web version.

Here’s the AP recap:

LOS ANGELES (AP) — From laughingstock to lift off.

George Springer and the Houston Astros rocketed to the top of the baseball galaxy Wednesday night, winning the first World Series championship in franchise history by romping past the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in Game 7.

Playing for a city still recovering from Hurricane Harvey, and wearing an H Strong logo on their jerseys, the Astros brought home the prize that had eluded them since they started out in 1962 as the Colt .45s.

“I always believed that we could make it,” All-Star slugger Jose Altuve said. “We did this for them.”

For a Series that was shaping up as an October classic, Game 7 quickly became a November clunker as Houston scored five runs in the first two innings off Yu Darvish. Hardly the excitement fans felt during the Cubs’ 10-inning thriller in Cleveland last fall.

Well, except for everyone wearing bright orange. Back in Houston, a huge crowd filled Minute Maid Park to cheer as fans watched on the big video board, and the train whistle wailed when it was over.

“We’re coming home a champion, Houston,” Springer said after accepting the World Series MVP trophy named this year for Willie Mays.

Star shortstop Carlos Correa turned the party into a proposal. After doing a TV interview, he got down on one knee and asked girlfriend Daniella Rodriguez, a former Miss Texas USA, to marry him.

“Yes?” he said, putting a ring on her finger as she cried.

Altuve, one of four holdovers from a club that lost an embarrassing 111 times in 2013 after switching from the NL to the AL, and this collection of young stars silenced Dodger Stadium from the get-go, taking a 5-0 lead in the second inning.

Altuve was in perfect position for the final out, a grounder by Corey Seager to the 5-foot-6 second baseman.

“I caught the last out for the Houston Astros to become a world champion. It was a groundball to me, I threw to first, and I think it was the happiest moment of my life in baseball,” Altuve said.

The Astros streamed from the dugout and bullpen to go wild, tossing their gloves in the air. A thousand or so fans crowded behind the first base dugout, chanting “Hou-ston! Hou-ston!”

Later, some little Astros kids ran around the outfield grass dressed in Halloween outfits. Their dads, meanwhile, were putting on championship hats and shirts.

At last, they had completed the ascent some predicted after a rebuilding club purged payroll and stripped down to bare bones a few years back.

Famously, now, there was the Sports Illustrated cover in 2014 — after Houston had lost more than 100 games for three straight seasons — that proclaimed: “Your 2017 World Series Champs” and featured a picture of Springer in a bright Astros jersey.

On the other side, ace Clayton Kershaw and several Dodgers leaned against the dugout railing, watching the Astros celebrate. Los Angeles led the majors with 104 wins and a $240 million payroll, and rallied to win Game 6, yet it didn’t pay off for part-owner Magic Johnson and his team.

“Obviously, this one hurts,” manager Dave Roberts said. “And like I told the guys, when you put everything, every ounce of your being into something and you come up short, it hurts. And it’s supposed to hurt.”

Normally a starter, Charlie Morton finished up with four stellar innings of relief for the win.

“We held down a really tough lineup,” Morton said. “For my teammates, for the city of Houston, it’s just unbelievable.”

Springer led off the evening with a double against Darvish, and soon it was 2-0.

Springer hit his fifth homer — tying the Series mark set by Reggie Jackson (1977) and matched by Chase Utley (2009) — when he connected for a record fourth game in a row, making it a five-run lead.

That was plenty for Houston manager A.J. Hinch. He pulled starter Lance McCullers Jr. soon after the curveballer crazily plunked his fourth batter of the game , and began a parade of four relievers that held the lead.

Throughout the postseason, Hinch and the unconventional Astros overcame a shaky bullpen by using starters in relief.

“I knew yesterday I didn’t have much,” said McCullers, the Game 3 winner. “I knew I didn’t have much to give other than to gut it out as long as I could.”

In a dramatic Series marked by blown leads and late rallies, when Houston twice outlasted the Dodgers in extra innings, McCullers did enough.

Forever known for their space-age Astrodome, outlandish rainbow jerseys and a handful of heartbreaking playoff losses for stars like Nolan Ryan, Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio, these Astros will be remembered as champions, finally, in their 56th season.

The club that wears a star on its hat also filled out the Texas trophy case. Teams from the Lone Star State had won most every major crown — the Super Bowl, NBA and NHL titles, championships in college football, and men’s and women’s hoops — except the World Series.

Built on the skills of homegrown All-Stars Dallas Keuchel and more, helped by veteran offseason acquisitions such as Brian McCann and 40-year-old Carlos Beltran, who won his first ring, and boosted by the slick trade for ace Justin Verlander, general manager Jeff Luhnow oversaw the team’s resurgence.

Houston won 101 times this year to take the AL West, then won Games 6 and 7 at home in the AL Championship Series against the New York Yankees. The Astros joined the 1985 Royals as the only clubs to win a pair of Game 7s in the same year.

When it was over, Bagwell and Biggio posed for pictures together with the World Series trophy.

For the Dodgers, the quest to win a Series for the first time since 1988 fell short.

Kershaw provided four shutout innings of relief for Los Angeles , but it was too late. What the Dodgers really needed was a better starter than Darvish, someone more like the lefty who tossed out a ceremonial first ball: the great Sandy Koufax.

Acquired from Texas on July 31 for these big games, Darvish lasted 1 2/3 innings in both his World Series starts — the two shortest of his career.

“This pain is going to stay in me for a while,” the four-time All-Star said through a translator.

After Springer lined a leadoff double , Alex Bregman hit a bouncer that first baseman Cody Bellinger threw past Darvish for an error, allowing a run to score . Bregman aggressively stole third and scored on Altuve’s grounder , and it was 2-0 after eight pitches.

A double by Marwin Gonzalez helped set up perhaps McCullers’ biggest contribution, a slow grounder for his first pro RBI. Springer followed with a no-doubt, two-run drive into the left-center field bleachers.

That was the Series-most 25th homer in a Major League Baseball season that set a record for home runs. It was easily enough for the Astros to offset pinch-hitter Andre Ethier’s RBI single in the Los Angeles sixth.

Only once have the Dodgers clinched a crown at home, that coming in 1963 when Koufax outpitched Yankees star Whitey Ford to finish a sweep. They’ve never won Game 7 of the Fall Classic at their own park, dating more than a century ago to their days on the streets of Brooklyn as the Trolley Dodgers.

As pockets of Houston fans got louder and louder in the later innings, the crowd at Dodger Stadium was left to repeat the sad, but hopeful cry that used to echo in Brooklyn: Wait till next year.

Just 106 days until pitchers and catchers report to spring training.

Here’s what you need to know:

Who: Houston Astros vs. L.A. Dodgers

What: Game 7, 2017 World Series

Where: Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles

When: Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017

Time: 8 p.m. Eastern

TV: Fox

Livestream: Fox Sports Go

Odds: Dodgers -125

Starting pitchers: Lance McCullers Jr. vs. Yu Darvish

Game 7 of the World Series.

It’s a chance to make history — whether you’re a star like Madison Bumgarner or a role player like Sandy Amoros.

The Dodgers and Astros will play Wednesday night on the biggest stage baseball has to offer, and in a one-game, winner-take-all scenario, just about anything is possible. This series has featured both home run binges and pitching duels, blown leads and surprising saves.

Giradi talks about Yankees firing

“I don’t anybody here is shocked that it’s going to Game 7,” Houston ace Justin Verlander said after Tuesday night’s 3-1 loss at Dodger Stadium.

Here’s a look back at Game 7 of the World Series, through the years:

THE CLASSICS

These games need no introduction. One name is often enough.

Bill Mazeroski. Jack Morris. Luis Gonzalez.

In 1960, Mazeroski led off the bottom of the ninth inning in Game 7 with a homer that gave Pittsburgh a 10-9 win over the New York Yankees. That slugfest was a wild one, with 10 runs scored in the final two innings.

The 1991 finale between Minnesota and Atlanta at the Metrodome was tense for different reasons. Morris pitched all 10 innings for the Twins, who finally won 1-0 on Gene Larkin’s bases-loaded single .

Gonzalez’s RBI single in 2001 capped a two-run, ninth-inning rally by Arizona against Mariano Rivera and the Yankees. The Diamondbacks won 3-2, denying New York a fourth straight championship.

Nearly a century ago, in 1924, Washington rallied from a two-run deficit in the eighth and eventually beat the New York Giants 4-3 in 12, with Walter Johnson pitching the final four innings in relief.

Amoros made his mark as a defensive sub in 1955, running down Yogi Berra’s drive in left field to halt a sixth-inning rally by the Yankees. Brooklyn held on for a 2-0 victory and finally won its first crown.

Cleveland hasn’t won a World Series since 1948 but came agonizingly close in 1997 and 2016, losing Game 7 in extra innings both years. Edgar Renteria’s 11th-inning hit won the ’97 Series for Florida, and the Chicago Cubs outlasted the Indians last year, winning 8-7 in 10 to take their first title since 1908.

THE ROUTS

Sometimes, Game 7 turns into a blowout. Detroit fans threw things at Joe Medwick of the Cardinals in 1934, as St. Louis was on its way to an 11-0 win over the Tigers. In 1985, the Cardinals were on the other end of an 11-0 drubbing, and this time they were the ones venting their frustration against the Royals. A missed call had gone Kansas City’s way near the end of Game 6, and St. Louis fell apart in Game 7. Manager Whitey Herzog and pitcher Joaquin Andujar were ejected.

OVERSHADOWED

Sometimes, the finale feels anticlimactic compared to what happened in Game 6. The 1975 World Series is remembered for Carlton Fisk’s game-winning homer for Boston that forced Game 7 — even though that last game was pretty special in its own right. Cincinnati beat the Red Sox 4-3 in Game 7, with Joe Morgan driving in the winning run in the top of the ninth.

After winning Game 6 on Bill Buckner’s error in 1986, the New York Mets made the most of their reprieve, rallying from a 3-0 deficit to beat Boston 8-5 in Game 7. In 2011, the Cardinals were down to their last strike in the ninth and 10th innings of Game 6. But they won that one, and Game 7 — a 6-2 St. Louis victory — wasn’t nearly as memorable.

THE STANDOUTS

Only one player has homered twice in Game 7 of the World Series. That was Berra in 1956, when the Yankees beat Brooklyn 9-0. Four players have had four hits — Max Carey (1925), Ripper Collins (1934), Willie Stargell (1979) and George Brett (1985). Their teams all won.

The most strikeouts for a pitcher in Game 7 is 10, by Hal Newhouser (1945), Sandy Koufax (1965), Bob Gibson (1967) and Roger Clemens (2001). Koufax’s gem — a 2-0 shutout of Minnesota — was the last time the Dodgers played in Game 7. Only two pitchers have thrown shutouts in Game 7 since then — Bret Saberhagen in ’85 and Morris in ’91.

(The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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New York terror suspect linked to social media with ISIS-related material – CNN

A 29-year-old man plowed into a crowd of bicyclists and pedestrians just blocks away from the World Trade Center Tuesday afternoon. Mangled bicycles littered the street as medics rushed to the victims.
Six victims were killed instantly. Two others died later. And 11 are trying to recover as authorities try to figure out what led to the attack.
How the New York City truck attack unfoldedHow the New York City truck attack unfolded
“This was an act of terror, and a particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians, aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea what was about to hit them,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said.
The suspect has been identified as Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov, according to two law enforcement sources. The Uzbekistan native allegedly drove a rented pickup truck onto a busy bike path, crashed the truck into a school bus, then stepped outside brandishing imitation firearms.
A police officer shot Saipov in the abdomen, but the suspect survived and underwent surgery Tuesday evening.
Saipov has been linked to social media accounts that contain ISIS-related material, a law enforcement official said Wednesday morning. The official also said Saipov has been somewhat cooperative with FBI and New York police investigators who questioned him in the hospital overnight.

Here are the latest developments in the attack:

  • Authorities conducted search warrants overnight at Saipov’s home in New Jersey.
  • Saipov had been an Uber driver in New Jersey for over six months, the company told CNN. Uber is cooperating with authorities in the investigation.
  • The President of Uzbekistan Shavkat Mirziyoyev said in an open letter published Wednesday that his country will use all “means necessary” to help the investigation. The suspect came to the US from the central Asian nation in 2010.
  • The New York police officer who shot and apprehended Saipov has been identified as 28-year-old Ryan Nash, a law enforcement source told CNN.
  • Authorities found a note near the truck used in the attack claiming the action was taken in the name of ISIS , a senior law enforcement official said.

The suspect

Officers were able to talk to Saipov before the surgery, but it was unclear if he told them anything, a law enforcement source told CNN.
Saipov came to the United States in 2010 from the central Asian nation of Uzbekistan, a law enforcement source said.
Most recently, he lived in New Jersey, according to a law enforcement source. Neighbors said he recently lived at least part-time in Paterson, New Jersey, not far from New York.
Just over six months ago, Saipov began driving for Uber in New Jersey, the company told CNN. He passed a background check and did not have any rider complaints about his safety as a driver, according to Uber.
He once listed his occupation as a truck driver, his marriage license shows.
Saipov had multiple run-ins with law enforcement in several states, online records show. He had traffic citations issued in Missouri and Pennsylvania and was arrested by the Missouri State Highway Patrol in October 2016 after failing to show up in court for a misdemeanor offense.
He paid a $200 bond, which he forfeited when he didn’t show up in court for his next hearing in November. A guilty plea was entered on his behalf.

The victims

Among the eight people killed, five were friends from Argentina celebrating their high school reunion in New York City, Argentina’s Foreign Affairs Ministry said.
Note found in truck claims Manhattan attack done for ISIS, source saysNote found in truck claims Manhattan attack done for ISIS, source says
“The Argentine Government expresses its sincere condolences for the death of Argentine citizens Hernán Diego Mendoza, Diego Enrique Angelini, Alejandro Damián Pagnucco, Ariel Erlij and Hernán Ferruchi which occurred as a result of the dramatic terrorist attack in New York this afternoon,” the ministry said in a statement.
They had traveled to New York from Rosario, a town nearly 200 miles northwest of Buenos Aires, to mark the 30th anniversary of their graduation from the Polytechnic School, a technical high school in Rosario.
A sixth Argentine national who was also part of the group was injured during the attack. He was out of danger, the ministry said, but as of Tuesday night, he was still recovering at New York-Presbyterian’s Lower Manhattan Hospital.
“Deeply moved by the tragic deaths this afternoon in NY,” Argentina’s President Mauricio Macri tweeted. “We put ourselves at the disposition of the families of the Argentinian victims.”
Didier Reynders, deputy prime minister and foreign affairs minister for Belgium, said a Belgian national was also among those killed.

The President’s response

Vehicles as weapons

Tuesday’s attack turned an ordinary vehicle into a lethal weapon, a tactic used in other recent attacks in the West.
In 2014, an ISIS spokesman called for lone wolf attacks using improvised weaponry. “If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock or slaughter him with a knife or run him over with your car or throw him down from a high place or choke him or poison him.”
Since 2014, there have been 15 vehicular attacks in the West by jihadist terrorists, killing 142 people, according to a count by New America, a nonpartisan research institution. Those figures include Tuesday’s attack in Manhattan.
Vehicles as weapons: New York City crash is part of a deadly trendVehicles as weapons: New York City crash is part of a deadly trend
For the past few years, police in New York have reached out to businesses that rent vehicles to warn them about possible terror threats and to let them know about ways to come forward.
“We did extensive outreach to the truck rental business. We visited over 148 truck rental locations in this area,” New York Police’s Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller said at a Tuesday news conference. “The industry has had a high level of awareness on this matter from the NYPD.”
Miller said that if a company is suspicious of a would-be renter, they usually delay or simply deny a rental to let police investigate it.
The suspect drove a Home Depot rental truck he drove from New Jersey, Miller said.
A spokesman for Home Depot confirmed one of the company’s rental trucks was part of an incident in lower Manhattan and said the company is “cooperating with authorities” in the investigation.
CORRECTION: This story has been updated to reflect the note claiming that the attack was made in the name of ISIS was found near the truck.

CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz, Brynn Gingras, Topher Gauk-Roger, Paul Murphy, Curt Devine and Patricia DiCarlo contributed to this report.

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New Yorkers defiant after deadliest terror attack in the city since 9/11 – CNN

How the New York City truck attack unfoldedHow the New York City truck attack unfolded
Families celebrated a traditional Halloween Parade hours after the attack, surrounded by police officers armed with long guns while dozens of local and federal law enforcement officers were still investigating the attack.
“This was an act of terror, and a particularly cowardly act of terror,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said, “aimed at innocent civilians, aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea what was about to hit them.”
The suspect has been identified as Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov, according to two law enforcement sources. He allegedly drove a rented pickup truck onto a busy bike path near the World Trade Center, crashed the truck into a school bus, then stepped outside brandishing imitation firearms. A police officer shot him in the abdomen, and he underwent surgery at a local hospital.

Here are the latest developments in the attack:

  • Saipov had been an Uber driver in New Jersey for over six months, the company told CNN. The company is cooperating with authorities in the investigation.
  • The New York police officer who shot and apprehended the suspect in Tuesday’s attack has been identified as Ryan Nash, a law enforcement source told CNN. The 28-year-old officer joined the department in 2012.
  • Argentina’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said on Twitter that five Argentine citizens were killed: Hernán Mendoza, Diego Angelini, Alejandro Pagnucco, Ariel Erlij and Hernán Ferruchi.
  • Authorities found a note, written in English, in the truck police said was used in the attack claiming the suspect did it in the name of ISIS, a senior law enforcement official told CNN.

The victims

In a matter of minutes, a popular bike path in New York’s lower Manhattan turned into a horrific scene. Crumpled bicycles littered the street as medics tended to the wounded.
Six people were declared dead at the scene, two were pronounced dead at the hospital and about a dozen were injured. Several were tourists visiting from abroad.
Note found in truck claims Manhattan attack done for ISIS, source saysNote found in truck claims Manhattan attack done for ISIS, source says
Five friends from Argentina who were celebrating their high school reunion were killed, Argentina’s Foreign Affairs Ministry said.
“The Argentine Government expresses its sincere condolences for the death of Argentine citizens Hernán Diego Mendoza, Diego Enrique Angelini, Alejandro Damián Pagnucco, Ariel Erlij and Hernán Ferruchi which occurred as a result of the dramatic terrorist attack in New York this afternoon,” the ministry said in a statement.
They had traveled to New York from Rosario, a town nearly 200 miles northwest of the country’s capital of Buenos Aires. They were celebrating the 30th anniversary of their graduation from the Polytechnic School, a technical high school in Rosario.
A sixth Argentine national who was also part of the group was injured during the attack. He was out of danger, the ministry said, but as of Tuesday night, he was still recovering at New York-Presbyterian’s Lower Manhattan Hospital.
“Deeply moved by the tragic deaths this afternoon in NY. We put ourselves at the disposition of the families of the Argentinian victims,” Argentina’s President Mauricio Macri tweeted.
Didier Reynders, deputy prime minister and foreign affairs minister for Belgium, said a Belgian national was also among those killed on Tuesday’s attack.

The suspect

After he was shot, Saipov underwent surgery on Tuesday. Officers were able to talk to him before the surgery, but it was unclear if he told them anything, a law enforcement source told CNN.
Saipov came to the United States in 2010 from the central Asian nation of Uzbekistan, a law enforcement source said.
Most recently, he lived in New Jersey, according to a law enforcement source. Neighbors said that he recently lived at least part-time in Paterson, New Jersey, not far from New York.
Just over six months ago, Saipov began driving for Uber in New Jersey, the company told CNN. He passed a background check and did not have any rider complaints about his safety as a driver, according to Uber.
He once listed his occupation as a truck driver, his marriage license shows.
The suspect had multiple interactions with law enforcement in several states, online records show. Saipov had traffic citations issued in Missouri and Pennsylvania. He was arrested by the Missouri State Highway Patrol in October 2016 after a warrant was issued when he failed to show in court for a misdemeanor offense. He paid a $200 bond, which he forfeited when he didn’t show up in court for his next hearing in November. A guilty plea was entered on his behalf.

Vehicles as weapons

Tuesday’s attack turned an ordinary vehicle into a lethal weapon, a tactic used in other recent attacks in the West.
In 2014, an ISIS spokesman called for lone wolf attacks using improvised weaponry. “If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock or slaughter him with a knife or run him over with your car or throw him down from a high place or choke him or poison him.”
Since 2014, there have been 15 vehicular attacks in the West by jihadist terrorists, killing 142 people, according to a count by New America, a nonpartisan research institution. Those figures include Tuesday’s attack in Manhattan.
Vehicles as weapons: New York City crash is part of a deadly trendVehicles as weapons: New York City crash is part of a deadly trend
For the past few years, police in New York have reached out to businesses that rent vehicles to warn them about possible terror threats and to let them know about ways to come forward.
“We did extensive outreach to the truck rental business. We visited over 148 truck rental locations in this area,” New York Police’s Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller said at a Tuesday news conference. “The industry has had a high level of awareness on this matter from the NYPD.”
Miller said that if a company is suspicious of a would-be renter, they usually delay or simply deny a rental to let police investigate it.
The suspect drove a Home Depot rental truck he drove from New Jersey, Miller said.
A spokesman for Home Depot confirmed one of the company’s rental trucks was part of an incident in lower Manhattan and said the company is “cooperating with authorities” in the investigation.

CNN’s Brynn Gingras, Topher Gauk-Roger, Curt Devine and Patricia DiCarlo contributed to this report.

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Parent who held teacher hostage at elementary school killed by police after hours-long standoff – Los Angeles Times

SWAT officers on Tuesday evening swarmed a Riverside elementary school classroom and shot a parent who had taken a teacher hostage, ending an hours-long standoff.

The parent, identified as Riverside resident Luvelle Kennon, 27, died later at a hospital, said Riverside Police Officer Ryan Railsback.

The teacher, Linda Montgomery, sustained some scrapes and abrasions when she was grabbed and pulled into an empty classroom, Railsback said.

During the seven-hour standoff, crisis negotiators made contact with the man, but never heard from Montgomery, which is why authorities decided to storm into the room at about 6 p.m. It’s unclear whether the man was armed, but witnesses did not report seeing any weapons.

Officials canceled classes at the elementary school for the rest of the week.

The incident began shortly before 11:15 a.m. when the man forced his way past staff in the main office at Castle View Elementary School, Riverside Unified spokesman Justin Grayson said.

The parent, who has a daughter in first grade, did not appear to follow the school district’s safety procedures and check in with the front desk, Railsback said.

A male teacher confronted the parent, who responded by hitting that teacher in the face, Railsback said. A witness told KABC that the teacher’s face was bloodied and his nose was broken. The teacher was treated at a hospital, police said.

The parent then took Montgomery hostage inside an empty classroom, police said, though it’s not clear why.

Police evacuated all students from the campus and began releasing them to their parents after 1 p.m. All the students were accounted for, Grayson said.

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For breaking California news, follow @JosephSerna on Twitter.

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Twitter: @AleneTchek

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UPDATES:

11:25 p.m.: This article was updated with the parent’s name.

10:10 p.m.: This article was updated with information that the man shot by police has died.

7 p.m.: This article was updated with information from a news conference.

6:10 p.m.: This article was updated to reflect that the standoff has ended.

6:05 p.m. This article was updated throughout.

3:30 p.m.: This article was updated with details about the beginning of the incident.

2:20 p.m.: This article was updated with information on student releases.

1:40 p.m.: This article was updated with details about the hostage.

1:15 p.m.: This article was updated with details about the campus evacuation.

This article was originally published at 12:55 p.m.

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