Brexit live: 'sad' Cameron says EU must deal with immigration concerns – The Guardian

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The Guardian

Brexit live: ‘sad’ Cameron says EU must deal with immigration concerns
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Harriet Harman, the former Labour deputy leader, has joined those calling on Jeremy Corbyn to resign. These are from the BBC’s Laura Kuennsberg. — Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) June 29, 2016. Harriet Harman urges Corbyn to go. — Laura …
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The Upshot|How Trump's Campaign Could Redraw Voter Allegiances – New York Times

The 2016 Race
By NATE COHN
June 29, 2016

For decades, Republicans argued for lower taxes, fewer regulations and a smaller welfare state. Democrats took up the opposite view, and voters split along familiar lines.

Whatever you think of Donald Trump, it is clear that this election has the potential to reshape the allegiances of many white working-class voters who have traditionally sided with the Democrats, and many well-educated voters who have sided with the Republicans.

Mr. Trump on Tuesday laid out a radically different economic message than Republicans have advanced, and it holds considerable appeal to white working-class Democrats. He supported renegotiating or withdrawing from Nafta, cracking down on Chinese currency manipulation, and using United States steel for domestic infrastructure — which he promises to rebuild.

Along with his departures on immigration and the welfare state, Mr. Trump is moving away from the labor fights and culture wars that defined 20th-century politics, and toward the new divide over globalization and multiculturalism that might define 21st-century politics.

Mr. Trump currently trails in most polls. But according to a 2014 study by Pew Research on political polarization, positions like those held by Mr. Trump on trade, immigration, guns and the environment have considerable support from white working-class Democrats.

Around 40 percent of white Democrats without a college degree agree that free trade has done more harm than good (exit polls showed the same thing in the Democratic primary), or think the United States should get tougher with China on economic issues. Similar numbers agree with Mr. Trump on guns and immigration. All of Mr. Trump’s stances are more popular than traditional Republican views on the welfare state or culture war issues like abortion or same-sex marriage.

The potential for Mr. Trump to break through among white working-class voters isn’t merely theoretical. Recent public opinion surveys — even those showing Mr. Trump trailing Mrs. Clinton by a wide margin — all show him leading Mrs. Clinton by a wider margin among white voters without a college degree than the margin by which Mitt Romney led President Obama in 2012. Over all, Mr. Trump leads among white voters without a college degree by a 57-to-31 margin in the last six national polls. Mr. Romney led by a 55-to-37 percent margin with those voters in a compilation of the final polls in 2012.

These gains have not been enough to give Mr. Trump an overall lead. He trails by an average of five points in the same surveys.

But the extent to which Mr. Trump is doing well among white working-class voters is important to Democrats. There are more white working-class voters than is generally believed, and Mr. Obama was stronger among these voters than typically assumed.

Mr. Trump’s speech on Tuesday was delivered in Monessen, Pa., the sort of place that typifies the overlooked Democratic resilience among white working-class voters, and that Mr. Trump needs in November. The area was once one of the most reliably Democratic parts of the country, and even today, Democrats still fare fairly well among white working-class voters. President Obama won Monessen by a 66-33 percent margin, and the town is at the tip of a region along the Monongahela River where Mr. Obama won among white working-class voters.

There are places like this — traditionally Democratic, white working-class areas where Mr. Obama still showed important strength — across the Northern United States. In Pennsylvania alone, there are similar regions along the Beaver River — north of Pittsburgh — or in the Scranton-Wilkes Barre area in northeast Pennsylvania. There’s Youngstown and Warren, Ohio — or a whole strip of towns along Lake Erie, from Toledo, Ohio, back to Erie, Pa. Many of these same areas broke heavily for Mr. Trump in the Republican primary.

We will not know until November whether Mr. Trump will attract these traditionally Democratic voters. Even if he does, he might fall far short of winning the presidency, as current polls suggest. His gains among less educated white voters have been neatly canceled by losses among well-educated voters.

This could prevent Mr. Trump from winning in states with a large white working class. A recent Marquette University poll showed Mr. Trump winning by seven points among white working-class voters in Wisconsin. Yet Mrs. Clinton was leading by a huge 22-point margin among well-educated white voters, even though four years ago they split almost evenly between parties. The same dynamic could doom Mr. Trump in Pennsylvania.

But if you want to know why Mr. Trump is still in striking distance — why Mrs. Clinton is generally well beneath 50 percent, and not faring too much better among registered voters than Mr. Obama was in the fall of 2012 — this is why: Mr. Trump has made big gains among less educated white voters. He has adopted a platform to do it.

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The Latest: Lithuanian leader says listen to the people – Houston Chronicle

European Council President Donald Tusk listens to questions during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. European Union leaders began plotting a future without Britain on Tuesday, urging the island nation and economic powerhouse to disentangle itself as fast as possible from the other 27 nations in the bloc to avoid extending the turmoil that has been roiling European and global markets. Photo: Virginia Mayo, AP / AP

Photo: Virginia Mayo, AP

European Council President Donald Tusk listens to questions during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Tuesday, June 28, 2016. European Union leaders began plotting a future without Britain on Tuesday, urging the island nation and economic powerhouse to disentangle itself as fast as possible from the other 27 nations in the bloc to avoid extending the turmoil that has been roiling European and global markets.

BRUSSELS (AP) — The Latest on British vote to leave the European Union (all times local):

9:30 a.m.

Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite says Europe must wake up and start listening to its citizens on issues like immigration and economic growth following the U.K.’s unprecedented vote to leave the European Union.

Grybauskaite said Wednesday as she arrived for a summit with EU counterparts minus Britain that “we all need to wake up and smell the coffee.”

She told reporters in Brussels that “Britain knows what to do after what they did. Today is about us, what we are going to do about our unity and about preparations for the transitional period, for British withdrawal.”

She underlined that “we need to listen to people.”

___

9:20 a.m.

Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel says Europeans are disenchanted with the EU project as the bloc’s leaders meet to pick up the pieces after the U.K. vote to leave.

“There is a perception of technocracy,” Michel told reporters Wednesday as EU leaders gathered without Britain to chart the way forward as 27 member states after the U.K. formally leaves.

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He said “we have to show that Europe brings a real added value that can be felt by our fellow citizens.”

His counterpart from neighboring Luxembourg said it was important to show unity at the meeting.

Bettel said that “with a disunited United Kingdom we need a united Europe more than ever.”

___

8:00 a.m.

EU leaders are meeting without Britain for the first time to rethink their union and keep it from disintegrating after Britain’s unprecedented vote to leave.

Divisions between the EU founders and newer countries in the east threaten to complicate any bold new plans at Wednesday’s meeting.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte says: “It’s not only the British voters who have doubts about European cooperation. There is skepticism in many other EU countries.”

Other EU countries are now facing calls, especially from the far right, for referendums on quitting the bloc. The 27 remaining EU members are also divided over how to deal with migration, which was a major issue in Britain’s vote last week.

British Prime Minister David Cameron left Brussels Tuesday night without any clear divorce plan.

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The Latest: Turkish PM Says Bombed Airport Has Reopened – New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
June 29, 2016

ISTANBUL — The Latest on the explosions at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport (all times local):

10:55 a.m.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, whose plane landed in Istanbul minutes after the attacks on Istanbul’s airport, has expressed his condolences to the victims.

Rama said in a message on Twitter that he felt “deep pity for the lost innocent lives in that barbarous act of those who have neither God or hope nor a place among the people.”

Rama, Finance Minister Arben Ahmetaj and a delegation on Wednesday are on an official visit to Turkey. Rama said all of the planned meetings would go ahead.

___

10:25 a.m.

Turkish officials say Istanbul’s busy Ataturk International Airport has reopened, hours after three suicide bombers killed 36 and wounded 147.

Turkey’s Prime Minister Binali Yildirim told reporters that air traffic returned to normal and “Our airport has been opened to flights and departures from 02:20 (local time) on,” in a press statement at the airport early Wednesday morning.

Turkish Airline’s website says “flight operations have been restarted” and instructs passengers to monitor actual flight information.

___

9:45 a.m.

Germany’s top security official is condemning the attack on Istanbul’s airport as “cowardly and brutal.”

Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said his thoughts were with the victims and their families, and vowed that “we will continue our fight against terrorism together with our allies with full force.”

De Maiziere said in a statement Wednesday he was “deeply shocked by the cowardly and brutal attack on Istanbul’s airport.”

He says “terrorism has once again shown its ugly face and innocent people have lost their lives.”

___

9:30 a.m.

NATO’s chief has strongly condemned the “horrific attacks” at Istanbul’s airport, and said Turkey’s 27 allies in the U.S-led political and military organization stand with it.

Jens Stoltenberg, NATO’s secretary-general, said in a statement: “My thoughts are with the families of the victims, those injured and the people of Turkey.

“There can be no justification for terrorism,” Stoltenberg said. “NATO Allies stand in solidarity with Turkey, united in our determination to fight terrorism in all its forms.”

___

8:00 a.m.

Officials on Wednesday morning began assessing the damage caused at Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport by three suicide bombers who killed dozens and wounded more than 140.

Workers were brought in to remove debris left by the blast, while in the daylight the damage to the terminal became clearer with even ceiling panels hit.

The airport was partially reopened, with the information board inside the airport showing that about one third of scheduled flights have been canceled, with a host of others delayed.

___

5 a.m.

A stoppage of flights to and from the United States and Istanbul Ataturk Airport lasted several hours but has been lifted, said a U.S. official who spoke on background to discuss sensitive security issues. The official said the stoppage was lifted in the middle of the evening.

The official says 10 passenger flights were in the air, flying from Turkey to the U.S., at the time of the stoppage and they have all landed. However, cargo planes and corporate jets in the U.S. would have been most affected by the stoppage. The official says the decision on lifting the stoppage was made in coordination with the Transportation Security Administration.

___

Associated Press writer Will Lester in Washington.

___

4 a.m.

According to the private Dogan news agency, a plane carrying Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama was landing at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport when the attack occurred. He was arriving on an official visit. The prime minister and his entourage were safely taken to an official residence. The group was to travel later on Wednesday to Turkey’s capital, Ankara.

___

3:50 a.m.

Saudi Arabia’s Embassy in Turkey says at least seven Saudis were injured in the Istanbul airport attack and all are in stable condition.

The embassy statement was carried on Saudi Arabia’s state-owned al-Ekhbaria news channel early Wednesday.

Muslim-majority Turkey is a popular tourist destination for Arabs from the Gulf, particularly during the summer. Tuesday’s attack also comes a week before the Eid holiday, which marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

___

3:25 a.m.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has condemned the “terrorist attack” at Istanbu’s Ataturkl airport and is calling for the perpetrators to be identified and brought to justice.

U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said the secretary-general “stands firmly by Turkey as it confronts this threat and stresses the need to intensify regional and international efforts to combat terrorism and violent extremism.”

Mogens Lykketoft, president of the 193-member U.N. General Assembly, expressed anger and grief at the attack.

“Once again we experience the senseless killing of innocent and peaceful civilians,” he said. “The international community must — through much closer cooperation — redouble efforts to contain and fight radical and violent extremism.”

___

3:10 a.m.

Turkey’s prime minister says 36 people and three suicide bombers have died in the attack at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim says that so far all indications point to the Islamic State group being behind the attack. He says the attackers arrived at the airport in a taxi and blew themselves up after opening fire.

Asked whether a fourth attacker might have escaped, he says authorities have no such assessment but are considering every possibility.

He says the victims include some foreigners and that many of the dozens wounded have minor injuries but others are more badly hurt.

He says the attacks come as Turkey is having success in fighting terrorism and trying to normalize ties with neighbors like Russia and Israel.

__

2:45 a.m.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says the United States condemns in the strongest terms possible the attacks at the Istanbul Ataturk Airport that killed at least 31 people and left dozens more wounded.

Earnest says the Istanbul airport, like the Brussels airport that was attacked earlier this year, is a symbol of international connections and the ties that bind nations together.

He says the U.S. sends its deepest condolences to the families and loved ones of those killed and wishes a speedy recovery to those injured.

Earnest says the United States remains steadfast in its support for Turkey, a NATO ally and partner, “along with all of our friends and allies around the world, as we continue to confront the threat of terrorism.”

___

2:35 a.m.

Turkey’s Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag says at least 31 people have been killed and some 147 wounded in the attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk airport.

Another senior government official says the death toll could climb much higher.

The senior official at first said close to 50 people had already died, but later said that the figure was expected to rise to close to 50.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol, also said all initial indications suggest the Islamic State group was behind the attack.

___

1:40 a.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has released a statement condemning the attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk airport, which took place during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. He says the attack “shows that terrorism strikes with no regard to faith and values.”

He has called on the international community to take a firm stand against terrorism and vowed to keep up Turkey’s struggle against terror groups.

Erdogan says “Turkey has the power, determination and capacity to continue the fight against terrorism until the end.”

___

1:20 a.m.

A senior Turkish government official has told The Associated Press all initial indications suggest the Islamic State group is behind the attack at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport.

The official also as many as four militants may have been involved in the attack Tuesday at the airport’s international terminal.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol.

___

This item has been corrected to remove retracted reference to nearly 50 people killed.

___

12:55 a.m.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier has condemned the attacks on Ataturk airport in Istanbul that have killed at least 28 people.

He says on the sidelines of an ecumenical Iftar dinner in Berlin that he’s shocked by the news.

He says the background of the attacks is still unclear, “but everything suggests that terrorists have once again hit the Turkish metropolis.

“We grieve for the victims and with the relatives. We stand by Turkey.”

___

12:50 a.m.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says officials are still trying to figure out who attacked the Ataturk airport in Istanbul and what exactly happened.

Kerry was speaking at the Festival of Ideas in Aspen, Colorado.

He says “This is daily fare and that’s why I say the first challenge we need to face is countering non-state, violent actors.”

___

12:40 a.m.

Hundreds of passengers are flooding out of Istanbul’s Ataturk airport after an attack that killed at least 28 people.

Twelve-year-old Hevin Zini had just arrived from Dusseldorf with her family and was in tears from the shock.

She tells The Associated Press that there was blood on the ground and everything was blown up to bits.

South African Judy Favish, who spent two days in Istanbul as a layover on her way home from Dublin, had just checked in when she heard an explosion followed by gunfire and a loud bang.

She says she hid under the counter for some time.

Favish says passengers were ushered to a cafeteria at the basement level where they were kept for more than an hour before being allowed outside.

___

12:15 a.m.

Turkey’s NTV television is quoting Istanbul’s governor as saying 28 people were killed in the attack at the city’s airport and some 60 people wounded.

Governor Vasip Sahin also told the channel that three suicide bombers carried out the attack Tuesday.

Officials had previously said one or two attackers had blown themselves up at the entrance to the international terminal at the airport after police fired at them.

___

12:10 a.m.

Hundreds of passengers are spilling out of Istanbul’s Ataturk airport with their suitcases in hand or stacked onto trolleys after two explosions killed at least 10 people.

Others are sitting on the grass, their bodies lit by the flashing lights of ambulances and police cars, which are the only kind of vehicles allowed to reach the airport.

Two South African tourists, Paul and Susie Roos from Cape Town, were at the airport and due to fly home at the time of the explosions Tuesday. They were shaken by what they witnessed.

Paul said: “We came up from the arrivals to the departures, up the escalator when we heard these shots going off.”

He added: “There was this guy going roaming around, he was dressed in black and he had a hand gun.”

___

11:40 p.m.

European Union leaders holding an unprecedented summit about Britain’s departure from the bloc are condemning a deadly attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk airport.

Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel tweeted from a closed-door meeting Tuesday in Brussels, “Despicable terror attack. Stand together with people of Turkey.”

Dalia Grybauskaite, president of Lithuania, wrote “Our thoughts are with the victims of the attacks at Istanbul airport. We condemn those atrocious acts of violence.”

The 28 EU leaders are meeting for an exceptional summit at which Prime Minister David Cameron announced his country has voted to leave the EU. They are also discussing migration via Turkey to the EU.

Two explosions rocked Istanbul’s Ataturk airport Tuesday, killing at least 10 people.

___

11 p.m.

A Turkish official says two attackers have blown themselves up at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport after police fire at them.

Turkish media quoted Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag as saying 10 people were killed in the attack on Tuesday.

Turkey’s state-run news agency quoted Bekir Bozdag as saying: “According to the information I was given, a terrorist at the international terminal entrance first opened fire with a Kalashnikov and then blew himself up. We have around 10 martyrs (dead) and around 20 wounded.”

The official said the attackers detonated the explosives at the entrance of the international terminal before entering the x-ray security check.

Turkish airports have security checks at both at the entrance of terminal buildings and then later before entry to departure gates.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol.

___

10:25 p.m.

A Turkish official says two explosions have rocked Istanbul’s Ataturk airport, wounding multiple people.

The official said Tuesday it was unclear whether the explosions were caused by a suicide attack.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol.

Turkish media reported the sound of gunfire at the scene.

Turkey has suffered several bombings in recent months linked to Kurdish or Islamic State group militants.

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Benghazi report has no new evidence of wrongdoing by Hillary Clinton – The Boston Globe

Representative Trey Gowdy, Republican of South Carolina, led the committee that issued the report.

J. Scott Applewhite/Associated press

Representative Trey Gowdy, Republican of South Carolina, led the committee that issued the report.

By David M. Herszenhorn New York Times  June 28, 2016

WASHINGTON — Ending one of the longest, costliest and most bitterly partisan congressional investigations in history, the House Select Committee on Benghazi issued its final report Tuesday, finding no new evidence of culpability or wrongdoing by Hillary Clinton in the 2012 attacks in Libya that left four Americans dead.

The 800-page report, however, included some new details about the night of the attacks, and the context in which they occurred, and it delivered a broad rebuke of government agencies like the Defense Department, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the State Department — and the officials who led them — for failing to grasp the acute security risks in Benghazi, and especially for maintaining outposts that they could not protect.

The committee, led by Representative Trey Gowdy, Republican of South Carolina, also harshly criticized an internal State Department investigation that it said had allowed officials like Clinton, then the secretary of state, to effectively choose who would investigate their actions.

In addition, it reiterated Republicans’ complaints that the Obama administration had sought to thwart the investigation by withholding witnesses and evidence.

The report, which includes perhaps the most exhaustive chronology to date of the attacks on a US diplomatic compound and their aftermath, did not dispute that US military forces stationed in Europe could not have reached Benghazi in time to rescue the personnel who died — a central finding of previous inquiries.

Still, it issued stinging criticism of the overall delay in response and the lack of preparedness on the part of the government.

“The assets ultimately deployed by the Defense Department in response to the Benghazi attacks were not positioned to arrive before the final lethal attack,” the committee wrote. “The fact that this is true does not mitigate the question of why the world’s most powerful military was not positioned to respond.”

But the lack of any clear-cut finding of professional misconduct or dereliction of duty was certain to fuel further criticism of the length the investigation — more than two years — and the expense, estimated at more than $7 million, in addition to Democrats’ allegations that the inquiry was specifically intended to damage Clinton’s presidential prospects.

After a campaign stop in Denver on Tuesday, Clinton told reporters the investigation had uncovered nothing to contradict past findings, arguing that the House committee’s work had assumed a “partisan tinge.”

“I’ll leave it to others to characterize this report,” she said, after taking a rare question from the traveling news media, “but I think it’s pretty clear, it’s time to move on.”

In a sign that Gowdy was also facing pressure from the right, two of the committee’s conservative members, Jim Jordan of Ohio and Mike Pompeo of Kansas, wrote a 48-page addendum including somewhat harsher criticism of the Obama administration, its response to the attacks, and its subsequent public explanations.

“Officials at the State Department, including Secretary Clinton, learned almost in real time that the attack in Benghazi was a terrorist attack,” Jordan and Pompeo wrote. “With the presidential election just 56 days away, rather than tell the American people the truth and increase the risk of losing an election, the administration told one story privately and a different story publicly.”

Technically, the report is not final until the full committee votes to accept it, which is expected as early as July 8. Still, some changes are possible, if they are accepted and approved by a majority vote.

By far, the committee’s most significant disclosure, even by Republicans’ own account, was unintentional and not directly related to Benghazi: that Clinton had exclusively used a private e-mail server during her four years as secretary of state. That revelation has spurred separate investigations into whether classified material was mishandled.

The Democrats on the committee said the Benghazi investigation dragged on longer than far more important congressional inquiries like the ones into the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the response to Hurricane Katrina.

In a Benghazi report that Democrats issued Monday, they also complained that they had been excluded from the development of the panel’s conclusions.

House Republicans added, inadvertently at times, to the general sense that the committee was focusing too intently on Clinton. Democrats seized on comments by the House majority leader, Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, who boasted on Fox News in September that the committee’s work had put a dent in Clinton’s poll numbers.

“Everybody thought Hillary Clinton was unbeatable, right?” McCarthy said. “But we put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee. What are her numbers today? Her numbers are dropping. Why? Because she’s untrustable. But no one would have known any of that had happened, had we not fought.”

Those comments helped derail McCarthy’s bid to succeed Speaker John A. Boehner. Gowdy has long disavowed the remarks, saying the discovery of the private e-mail server was highly unexpected and not a focus of his investigation.

There was also internal discord, which led to a former investigator for the committee, Bradley F. Podliska, a major in the Air Force Reserve, filing a lawsuit alleging that he was fired for trying to conduct a thorough investigation into the attacks while superiors wanted to focus on the private email server.

The committee said Podliska was fired for cause, including mishandling of classified information.

In the most dramatic confrontation during the two years of the investigation, Clinton testified before the committee for more than eight hours in October, a hearing that was widely perceived to have backfired on Republicans, as Clinton answered their questions and coolly deflected their attacks.

By the time of her testimony, Clinton had already taken responsibility for the State Department’s handling of the attacks.

The previous investigations had concluded that State Department officials had erred in not better securing the diplomatic compound amid reports of a deteriorating security situation. But the inquiries also determined that the attacks had come with little warning and that it would have been difficult to intervene once they had begun.

The investigations generally concluded that after the attack, the Obama administration’s talking points — a matter of much dispute — were flawed but not deliberately misleading.

The Pentagon had no forces that be readily sent to Benghazi when the crisis unfolded. The closest AC-130 gunship was in Afghanistan. There are no armed drones within range of Libya. There was no Marine expeditionary unit — a large seaborne force with its own helicopters — in the Mediterranean Sea.

The Africa Command, whose area of operation includes North Africa, also did not have on hand its own force able to respond rapidly to emergencies. Every other regional command had one at the time. The Pentagon was caught unprepared for this type of crisis.

On the night of the attacks, the Pentagon was able to divert an unarmed Predator drone operating 90 miles away to Benghazi, and the CIA later used it to help plan an escape route for the surviving Americans. But other military forces were too far away or could not be mobilized in time, military commanders have said.

The unclassified version of a 2012 independent report into the attacks, headed by Thomas Pickering, a former diplomat, concluded that “there simply was not enough time given the speed of the attacks for armed U.S. military assets to have made a difference.”

But the report did not address whether it would have been prudent to station quick-reaction forces in the region — a step the Pentagon has since taken in the aftermath of the tragedy.

On Sept. 11, 2012, Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and Sean Smith, a State Department information officer, were killed in an attack on the main US diplomatic compound in Benghazi by a mob of militia fighters who had been incited by an American-made video deriding the Prophet Muhammad. The fighters were apparently further inflamed by news of an assault on the US Embassy in Cairo.

Two other Americans, Tyrone S. Woods and Glen A. Doherty, who were contractors for the CIA, died later when a separate annex run by the agency came under mortar attack.

Previous investigations, including the internal inquiry by the State Department, found serious security gaps but also concluded that US forces could not have reached Benghazi in time to save the Americans, despite claims by some Republicans that Clinton had ordered troops to “stand down.”

At the time the select committee was created, in addition to the State Department’s review, there had been at least seven other congressional inquiries into the Benghazi attacks. A House Intelligence Committee investigation, perhaps the most comprehensive until now, found that Obama administration officials had not intentionally misled the public with their talking points in the days after the attacks.

The select committee interviewed at least 107 witnesses, including 81 who committee staff members said had not previously been interviewed by Congress. The committee also said it had reviewed 75,000 pages of documents.

“You can read this report in less time than our fellow citizens were taking fire and fighting for their lives on the rooftops and in the streets of Benghazi,” Gowdy said.

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Istanbul airport attack: Signs point to ISIS – CBS News

ISTANBUL — Suicide attackers killed dozens and wounded more than 140 at Istanbul’s busy Ataturk Airport, andTurkish officials blamed Tuesday’s massacre at the international terminal on three militants with suspected ties to ISIS (the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria).

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said 36 were dead as well as the three suicide bombers. Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said 147 were wounded.

Another senior government official told The Associated Press the death toll could climb much higher. The senior official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol, at first said close to 50 people had already died, but later said that the figure was expected to rise to close to 50.

20 Photos

Deadly terror blasts at Istanbul airport

Two suicide bombers blew themselves up rocking the country’s largest airport in Istanbul on June 28, 2016, leaving multiple people injured, and s…

Hundreds of frightened passengers streamed out of the airport, fleeing the latest of several bombings to strike Turkey in recent months. The attacks on a key partner in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS and a NATO member have increased in scale and frequency. They have scared off tourists and hurt the Turkish economy, which relies heavily on tourism.

Officials began assessing the damage Wednesday morning. Workers were brought in to remove debris left by the blast, while in the daylight the damage to the terminal became clearer — even ceiling panels had been hit.

Yildirim, speaking to reporters at the airport, said all initial indications suggested ISIS was behind the attack.

“The findings of our security forces point at the Daesh organization as the perpetrators of this terror attack,” Yildirim said, using the Arabic name for ISIS. “Even though the indications suggest Daesh, our investigations are continuing.”

Passengers embrace outside main entrance of Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey on June 28, 2016, after blasts and gunfire left dozens dead and injured

Passengers embrace outside main entrance of Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey on June 28, 2016, after blasts and gunfire left dozens dead and injured

OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the fact that ISIS could be the culprit in another airport attack is a sign of weakness.

Speaking Tuesday evening at the Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado, Kerry said, “It has been more than one year since Daesh has actually launched a full scale military offensive, and that’s because our coalition is moving relentlessly on every front. … Now, yes, you can bomb an airport, you can blow yourself up. That’s the tragedy. … And if you’re desperate and if you know you are losing, and you know you want to give up your life, then obviously you can do some harm. … We are still collecting information and trying to ascertain what happened and who did it.”

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CBSN

John Kerry: We have to get it right

John Kerry responded Tuesday night to the attack at the airport in Istanbul. The secretary of state said that the attack appears to be the work o…

Passengers described scenes of carnage.

South African Judy Favish, who spent two days in Istanbul as a layover on her way home from Dublin, had just checked in when she heard an explosion followed by gunfire.

Favish told CBSN passengers were ushered to a cafeteria on the basement level and kept there for more than an hour before being allowed outside.

“Coming out … there was blood everywhere,” she said. “One of the little rooms had been shattered. It was horrible. It was just horrible — chaos and blood and people running around and anxious worried, and it was just horrible.”

Turkey shares long, porous borders with Syria and Iraq, war-torn countries where ISIS controls large pockets of territory. Authorities have blamed ISIS for several major bombings over the past year, including on the capital Ankara, as well as attacks on tourists in Istanbul.

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CBS Evening News

Who could be behind Istanbul attack?

CBS News’ senior national security analyst Juan Zarate weighs in on the possible motive and origin of the attack at Istanbul Ataturk Airport.

In the wake of the Istanbul assault, additional security was being rolled out in numerous U.S. airports, among them those in the New York and Miami metropolitan areas.

Turkey has stepped up controls at airports and land borders and deported thousands of foreign fighters, but has struggled to tackle the threat of ISIS militants while also conducting vast security operations against Kurdish rebels, who have also been blamed for recent deadly attacks.

The devastation at Istanbul’s airport follows the March attack on Brussels Airport, where two suicide bombings ripped through check-in counters, killing 16 people. ISIS claimed responsibility for that attack, as well as a subsequent explosion at a Brussels subway station that killed 16 more people.

Yildirim said air traffic at Ataturk Airport, which was suspended after the attack, had resumed and was back to normal early Wednesday, though the information board inside the airport showed that about a third of scheduled flights have been canceled and a host of others delayed.

Riot police officer stands guard ealrly on June 289, 2016 at entrance of Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey, following gunfire and multiple suicide bombings the day before

Riot police officer stands guard ealrly on June 289, 2016 at entrance of Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey, following gunfire and multiple suicide bombings the day before

MURAD SEZER, REUTERS

A stoppage of flights to and from the United States and Istanbul lasted several hours but was later lifted, said a U.S. official who spoke on background in order to discuss sensitive security issues.

Yildirim said the attackers arrived at the airport in a taxi and blew themselves up after opening fire. Asked whether a fourth attacker might have escaped, he said authorities have no such assessment but are considering every possibility.

Another Turkish official said two of the attackers detonated explosives at the entrance of the international arrivals terminal after police fired at them, while the third blew himself up in the parking lot.

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The official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government regulations, cited interior ministry information and said that none of the attackers managed to get past security checks at the terminal’s entrance.

Turkish airports have security checks at both the entrance of terminal buildings and then later before entry to departure gates.

Roads around the airport were sealed off for regular traffic after the attack and several ambulances could be seen driving back and forth. Passengers were left sitting on the grass outside the airport.

Two South African tourists, Paul and Susie Roos from Cape Town, were at the airport and due to fly home at the time of the explosions.

Relative of victim of June 28, 2016 attack in Ataturk Airport waits outside Bakirkoy Sadi Konuk Hospital in early hours of June 29, 2016 in Istanbul, Turkey

Relative of victim of June 28, 2016 attack in Ataturk Airport waits outside Bakirkoy Sadi Konuk Hospital in early hours of June 29, 2016 in Istanbul, Turkey

Defne Karadeniz, Getty Images

“We came up from the arrivals to the departures, up the escalator when we heard these shots going off,” Paul Roos said. “There was this guy going roaming around, he was dressed in black and he had a hand gun.”

The prime minister called for national unity and “global cooperation” in combatting terrorism.

“This (attack) has shown once again that terrorism is a global threat,” Yildirim said. “This is a heinous planned attack that targeted innocent people.”

He suggested that the attack was linked to what he said was Turkey’s success against Kurdish rebels, as well as steps Ankara took Monday toward mending strained ties with Israel and Russia.

“It is meaningful that this heinous attack came at a time when we have become successful in the fight against separatist terrorism … and at a time when we started a process of normalizing ties with our neighbors,” Yildirim said.

Relatives embrace as they leave Istanbul's Ataturk Airport after June 28, 2016 assault that took dozens of lives and wounded dozens more

Relatives embrace as they leave Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport after June 28, 2016 assault that took dozens of lives and wounded dozens more

OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

Yildirim said there was no security lapse at the airport, but added the fact the attackers were carrying weapons “increased the severity” of the attack.

The victims included some foreigners, he said, adding that many of the wounded have minor injuries but others were more badly hurt.

The independent DHA news agency said the wounded, among them police officers, were transferred to Bakirkoy State Hospital.

Turkey is beset by a wide array of security threats, including from ultra-left radicals, Kurdish rebels demanding greater autonomy in the restive southeast, and ISIS militants.

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On Jan. 12, an attack that Turkish authorities blamed on ISIS claimed the lives of a dozen German tourists visiting Istanbul’s historic sites. On March 19, a suicide bombing rocked Istanbul’s main pedestrian street, killing five people, including the bomber, whom the authorities identified as a Turkish national linked to ISIS.

Last October, twin suicide bombings hit a peace rally outside Ankara’s train station, killing 102 people. There was no claim of responsibility but Turkish authorities blamed the attack on a local ISIS cell.

Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport was the 11th busiest airport in the world last year, with 61.8 million passengers, according to Airports Council International. It is also one of the fastest-growing airports in the world, seeing 9.2 percent more passengers last year than in 2014.

The largest carrier at the airport is Turkish Airlines, which operates a major hub there. Low-cost Turkish carrier Onur Air is the second-largest airline there.

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Clinton claims House Benghazi report 'found nothing,' says time to 'move on' – Fox News

Judge Napolitano reacts to the latest report

 

Hillary Clinton claimed Tuesday that the final report issued by the House Republican investigation into the deadly Sept. 11, 2012, Benghazi terror attack — in which Clinton is accused of knowingly misleading the American public —  “had found nothing,” and that it’s time to “move on.” 

The report released Tuesday morning pointedly blamed a “rusty bureaucratic process” for the Obama administration’s slow-moving response the night of the attack. The report said that despite orders from President Obama and then-Defense Secretary Leon Panetta to deploy assets in response to the attack on the compound to aid Ambassador Chris Stevens, his staff and security personnel, the first military force did not do so until more than 13 hours after the attack started.

Nonetheless, Clinton and her allies worked to sweep aside the committee’s damning, 800-page report, attempting to cast the investigation as nothing more than a political exercise.

“I understand that after more than two years and $7 million dollars spent by the Benghazi committee, out of taxpayer funds, it had to today report it had found nothing, nothing to contradict” prior findings, said Clinton, who was campaigning in Denver.

In Washington, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest echoed her remarks.

“There’s only one remaining question, and it’s simply this: is the RNC going to disclose the in-kind contribution that they have received from House Republicans today,” he said, claiming the investigation was meant to “tear down Secretary Clinton’s poll numbers.”

The latest headlines on the 2016 elections from the biggest name in politics. See Latest Coverage →

Republican committee members — let by Chairman Trey Gowdy, R-S.C. — insisted their work was not political.

“Read the report,” Gowdy repeatedly said. 

“You can read this report in less time than our fellow citizens were taking fire and fighting for their lives on the rooftops and in the streets of Benghazi,” he also said in a written statement. 

Meanwhile, accusations were flying on both sides of the aisle as the document became an inevitable political football on the 2016 field.

The Republican Party said the report demonstrates a “politically-motivated cover up” by Clinton and the administration.  

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, did not immediately respond to the report — but later weighed in on Twitter.

“Benghazi is just anotherHillary Clinton failure. It just never seems to work the way it’s supposed to with Clinton,” he tweeted.

Benghazi is just another Hillary Clinton failure. It just
never seems to work the way it’s supposed to with Clinton.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 28, 2016

Clinton and her campaign dismissed the document outright.

“The Republicans on the House Benghazi Committee are finishing their work in the same, partisan way that we’ve seen from them since the beginning,” Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon said in a written statement. “In refusing to issue its report on a bipartisan basis, the Committee is breaking from the precedent set by other Congressional inquiries into the Benghazi attacks.”

The report faulted the Obama administration for a range of missteps before, during and after the 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya that led to the deaths of Stevens, foreign service officer Sean Smith and former Navy SEALs Ty Woods and Glen Doherty.

The report said one anti-terrorism security team known as the FAST unit sat waiting for three hours in Rota, Spain, as Marines changed “in and out of their uniforms four times,” and even debated whether they should carry personal weapons, according to one witness. All together, the report said, “it would take nearly 18 hours” for that team to move.

The report described a web of internal debates and hold-ups, including apparent State Department guidance that “Libya must agree to any deployment,” though Panetta would later say Libya approval was not necessary. 

And while various officials debated how to proceed — and U.S. personnel were under attack at two sites in Benghazi — the report said Clinton and other officials were occupied with pushing a narrative that an anti-Islam YouTube video was the reason for the attack, a claim the administration later retracted. 

The report also said Clinton told the Egyptian prime minster they knew the attack had nothing to do with the film and was a planned attack – despite statements being made by her and others referencing the video. 

At the press conference, Gowdy and other GOP lawmakers lamented that none of the assets placed on the ready by Obama and Paneta were ordered to Benghazi.

“Nothing was ever coming to Benghazi,” Gowdy said. 

Lawmakers contrasted the “heroism” of those on the ground with the discussions in Washington. Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., described the D.C. attitude as “near fecklessness.” He said, “They were more concerned about how they’re going to offend the Libyan government than how this rescue is going to take place.”

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus blamed Clinton outright, saying she was “in charge, knew the risks and did nothing.”

“Together the report’s findings make clear we cannot afford to let Hillary Clinton be our next commander-in-chief,” he said. Appearing on MSNBC, Gowdy said Democrats “will be shocked when they read the report, if they do bother to read the report.” 

The report also showed:

  • During a White House meeting convened roughly three hours into the attack, “much of the conversation focused on the video.”
  • The forces that came to evacuate State Department and CIA officers that night were not fellow Americans, but a secret unit of former military officers from the Qaddafi regime, which the Obama administration had helped overthrow. 
  • “Security deficiencies plagued the Benghazi Mission compound in the lead-up to September 2012.” 
  • Panetta told the committee “an intelligence failure” occurred, while former CIA Deputy Director Michael Morell also acknowledged an intelligence failure. 

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EU leaders to meet without Cameron after Brexit vote – BBC News

European Union leaders are to begin the second day of their summit in Brussels – but without the UK after it last week voted to leave the bloc.

On Tuesday British PM David Cameron told the other 27 leaders that trade and security co-operation would be vital whatever the future links.

Germany’s Angela Merkel urged the EU to “respect the result” of the UK vote.

But she and other leaders renewed their call for Britain to set out plans for leaving as soon as possible.

They insist there can be no negotiation before the UK has formally invoked Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, which will trigger the withdrawal talks.

‘Great concern’

Tuesday’s meeting in Brussels was Mr Cameron’s final EU summit, after he announced his intention to stand down by October.

The 27 other leaders will shortly gather in the Belgian capital to discuss the future without the UK. This has not happened for more than 40 years.

The BBC’s Chris Morris in Brussels says there will be calls for unity and for reform, and promises will need to be put into practice quickly because the UK referendum has shaken Europe to the core.

On Tuesday, Mr Cameron said the rest of the EU wanted to have the “closest possible” relationship with the UK after Brexit.

But he said immigration was a “great concern” among UK voters and squaring this with access to the EU single market would be a “huge challenge”.

In Brussels, German politicians insisted the UK cannot “cherry-pick” aspects of the EU.

Mrs Merkel stressed that the UK must accept free movement if it wanted to retain access to the single market.

“We all regretted the result and made clear that the legal procedure must be that the UK invokes Article 50,” she said. “Mr Cameron said he would hand it over to the new government to do. We all agreed that before that point, there can be no formal or informal negotiations.”

She added: “We can see no way to turn this around. It’s not a time for wishful thinking, but of contemplating the reality.”

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said the UK did not have “months to meditate” on activating Article 50.

“If someone from the Remain camp will become British prime minister, this has to be done in two weeks after his appointment,” he said.

“If the next British PM is coming from the Leave campaign, it should be done the day after his appointment.”

Mr Cameron told reporters the discussions had been “calm, constructive and purposeful”.

He said there was “universal respect” for the UK’s decision to leave despite a “tone of sadness and regret”.

While the EU wanted more information about the UK’s negotiating plans going forward and a “clear model appearing”, he said there was an acknowledgement that this would take some time and “no great clamour” for talks to begin straight away.

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36 killed in suicide attack at Istanbul airport – USA TODAY

The death toll continues to rise after multiple explosions rocked Istanbul’s Ataturk International Airport. At least 3 suicide bombers were involved and officials suspect the Islamic State might be behind the deadly attack.

ISTANBUL — At least 36 people died and dozens more were injured late Tuesday after three suspected Islamic State terrorists blew themselves up at Ataturk International Airport, according to Turkish officials.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said three suicide bombers were responsible for the attack and all initial indications suggest the Islamic State group was behind it.

He said the attackers arrived at the airport in a taxi and blew themselves up after opening fire. Asked whether a fourth attacker might have escaped, he said authorities have no such assessment but are considering every possibility. The first reports emerged about the attack at about 10 p.m. local time Tuesday.

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said 147 were hurt, the Chicago Tribune and CNN reported.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in a statement that the incident “shows that terrorism strikes with no regard to faith and values” and vowed that “Turkey has the power, determination and capacity to continue the fight against terrorism until the end.”

The Associated Press quoted an unnamed senior Turkish official, who verified that nearly 50 had died. But AP later revised that number to 32 and noted that the death toll could rise to close to 50.

The airport remained on lockdown Tuesday, the subway system was shut down, and roads leading to the airport were closed off by police. The Federal Aviation Administration suspended flights between Istanbul and the United States.

Immediately after the blasts, images shot by bystanders and local media and aired on CNN Turk showed panicked travelers cowering in stores, ambulances wheeling the injured away, and people in tears on their cellphones. One video showed a bomber detonating himself as terrified people fled for their lives moments before the explosion.

Witnesses described a scene of chaos. Two South African tourists, Paul and Susie Roos from Cape Town, were at the airport to fly home and were shaken by what they witnessed.

USA TODAY

Turkey is vulnerable to growing terror attacks

“We came up from the arrivals to the departures, up the escalator when we heard these shots going off,” Paul Roos told the Associated Press. “There was this guy going roaming around, he was dressed in black and he had a hand gun.”

Global officials condemned the attack.

“We stand in solidarity with our NATO Ally Turkey in combating the threat of terrorism,” U.S. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said in a statement. “Sadly, this murderous attack is only the latest in a series of attacks aimed at killing and maiming innocent civilians.  Such attacks will only reinforce our determination to work with the Government of Turkey to counter the scourge of terrorism and support all those across the region who are working to promote peace and reconciliation.”

United Nations Secretary General Ban ki-Moon offered condolences to the loved ones of the victims. “The Secretary-General hopes that the perpetrators of this crime will be identified and brought to justice,” he said in a statement.

Tuesday’s bombing is the latest in a wave of terror attacks in Turkey as the country grapples with a spillover from the civil war raging in neighboring Syria.

No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack at Turkey’s largest airport — the third busiest in Europe. In the past, the government in Ankara has blamed Islamic State terrorists or Kurdish separatists for recent attacks.

“I’m left speechless,” said Ekin Calsir, a filmmaker in Istanbul about news of the attacks on the airport. “This hatred keeps killing us and it has to end.”

“My loved ones narrowly escaped it,” she added, referring to her close friend who arrived at the airport an hour before the attack. “I’m almost sure that there will be more attacks, sadly. I don’t know if they will increase but they will be there as long as the war (Syria) goes on. I feel insecure.”

A Turkish official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol and cited interior ministry information, said none of the attackers managed to get past security checks at the terminal’s entrance.

Turkish airports have security checks at both the entrance of terminal buildings and then later before entry to departure gates.

Istanbul’s Ataturk airport was the 11th busiest airport in the world last year, with 61.8 million passengers, according to Airports Council International. It is also one of the fastest-growing airports in the world, seeing 9.2 percent more passengers last year than in 2014.

Turkey has been a transit point for foreign fighters entering Syria through its borders, though Washington has said the government has been cracking down on the movement recently.

Turkey opposes the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, but has also been concerned about the growing prominence of Kurdish fighters in Syria who are fighting Assad. Some of the rebels fighting in Syria have ties to Kurdish groups in Turkey.

USA TODAY

White House condemns ‘heinous terrorist attack’ in Istanbul

Earlier this month a car bomb exploded in central Istanbul, killing at least 11 people. The banned Kurdish Worker’s Party was suspected of carrying out the attack, according to media reports.

In April a female suicide bomber carried out an attack in Bursa, wounding 13 people.

An explosion in December at another airport in Istanbul left one dead.

President Obama was briefed about the incident by his homeland security adviser, Lisa Monaco, shortly after the news broke, the White House said.

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, tweeted: “We must do everything possible to keep this horrible terrorism outside the United States.”

We must do everything possible to keep this horrible terrorism outside the United States.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 28, 2016

Near the airport in Istanbul, taxi driver Abdulrahman Namli said he was worried about terrorists targeting Turkey. “(We have) a big problem,” he said.

Eversley reported from New York. Contributing: Bradley Secker in Istanbul, Jabeen Bhatti in Berlin and Jim Michaels in McLean, Va.; The Associated Press

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/28YEynz

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Sources: Dwyane Wade open to outside offers as Heat talks stall – ESPN

9:20 PM ET

  • Brian WindhorstESPN Senior Writer
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    • ESPN.com NBA writer since 2010
    • Covered Cleveland Cavs for seven years
    • Author of two books

Dwyane Wade‘s initial contract discussions with the Miami Heat have not produced a common ground between the parties, and he is preparing to field outside offers when free agency opens Friday, according to league sources.

Sources told ESPN.com that Wade’s representatives have made it known to multiple teams over the last several days that he will be on the market. Some teams have been skeptical, wondering if Wade would seriously consider leaving the franchise where he has played 13 seasons and won three titles.

The Heat and Wade had several contentious weeks last year before they agreed on a one-year, $20 million deal for this past season.

Wade, 34, played in 74 games, his most in five years, and averaged 19 points, 4.1 rebounds and 4.6 assists in what was seen as a strong indication he had moved past the knee issues that had plagued him for several years.

At the end of the season, Wade said he hoped negotiations with the Heat would go more smoothly this summer.

“I hope that everything is quiet and works out the way I want it to,” Wade said. “But I have no control over that, as much as people might think. It’s a lot of moving parts in free agency. I’m not worried about it.”

The Heat currently have around $40 million in cap space and have nine free agents, including Wade, Hassan Whiteside and Luol Deng.

They are one of the six teams to have a confirmed meeting with Kevin Durant once free agency begins. This has led the team to attempt to keep maximum flexibility as they head into July.

In addition to gauging Durant’s interest, Miami has to manage the Chris Bosh situation as his status heading into next season is undetermined. Bosh’s season was cut short for the second year in a row because of health concerns stemming from a blood clot issue.

ESPN reporter Michael Wallace contributed to this report.

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