As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, +10.18%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, -0.93%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, -0.93%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, +10.18%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, -0.93%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, -0.93%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, -8.41%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, +10.18%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

As the stock market is in turmoil, here’s what experts are watching for as the NYSE operates without humans for the first time

The New York Stock Exchange is going all-electronic on Monday, marking the first time that the centuries-old exchange will operate in regular hours without its legion of trusted flesh-and-blood floor traders.

“It’s unprecedented, it’s never happened before,” said one NYSE official who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to publicly talk about the exchange’s operations. “Our markets have never been open while our trading floor’s not open.”

James Angel, professor at Georgetown University and an expert in market structure, told MarketWatch on Sunday that the stakes for the NYSE are “very high.”

To put things into perspective, the NYSE traces its origins back to May 16, 1792, and in 1817 the New York Stock Exchange Board was formed. And over those past 228 years, the NYSE has never operated without a group of traders functioning as the anchor to the U.S.’s biggest trading platform by market share. The NYSE has shut on a number of other occasions, most recently in 2012 during superstorm Sandy.

“In previous closures, the entire market was closed,” said Angel. “This will be the first time the NYSE classic will be operating purely electronic,” he said. 

“The stakes are very high because the NYSE has always been in the crosshairs of the media and the slightest misstep they make will be seen by millions of people,” the Georgetown professor explained.

The NYSE’s parent company, Intercontinental Exchange Inc. ICE, +10.18%, on Wednesday said it was temporarily closing the floor and shifting to all-electronic trading after a trader and an employee tested positive for COVID-19, the infectious disease that has claimed more than 14,000 lives globally and has caused near national lockdown, with a number of state and city governments implementing severe restrictions to attempt to limit the spread of

Read More Here...

S&P/ASX 200 futures down as markets become eerie, Trump to speak pre-market

S&P/ASX 200 (INDEXASX:XJO) (ASX:XJO) futures are yet to open but went into the weekend down around 3% after the ASX 200 closed up 0.70% to 4,816.6 last Friday.

With case numbers and deaths increasing at high rates across the world including Italy which had nearly 800 deaths in a single day, the world is in a dark place.

But the saying goes, it is always darkest before the dawn.

Last week, Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) co-founder Bill Gates said a potential shutdown of  the US could last between 6 to 10 weeks if all goes well.

Last Friday, the S&P 500 Index (INDEX:. INX) closed at 2,304.92, −104.47 or down 4.34% and the Nasdaq Composite (INDEXNASDAQ: .IXIC) closed at 6,879.52, −271.06 or down 3.79%.

[VIDEO] Morning Report – Investors brace for further ASX declines on Mondayhttps://t.co/oUQkN0hHBx#ausbiz

— CommSec (@CommSec) March 22, 2020

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