Rachelle Loyear, Vice President, G4S Americas

Rachelle Loyear, Vice President, G4S Americas – NASDAQ News Today – EIN News

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A service for global professionals · Wednesday, June 26, 2019 · 489,086,731 Articles · 3+ Million Readers News Monitoring and Press Release Distribution Tools News Topics Newsletters Press Releases Events & Conferences RSS Feeds Other Services Questions?

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Asian Shares Mostly Lower Wednesday

In an early afternoon speech, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

Trade policy remains the biggest source of uncertainty looming over the market. Investors are worried about the trade dispute between the U.S. and China and its potential impact on global economic growth and corporate profits.

Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping will meet this week at the G-20. The world’s two largest economies spent much of the current quarter escalating their trade war and giving global markets jitters over prospects for economic growth.

“To a large extent, any further deterioration in trade relations is expected to guide expectations here so the focus remains up ahead with the G-20,” said Jingyi Pan, market strategist at IG in Singapore.

ENERGY:

Benchmark crude oil rose $1.22 to $59.05 a barrel, amid worries about tensions in the Middle East, centered around concerns about Iran, and industry data that showed a decrease in U.S. crude oil inventories. It fell 7 cents to settle at $57.83 a barrel Tuesday. Brent crude oil, the international standard, rose $1.05 to $65.33 a barrel.

CURRENCIES:

The dollar rose slightly to 107.39 Japanese yen from 107.03 yen on Tuesday. The euro weakened to $1.1360 from $1.1381.

(CZ)

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Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...

Markets drop after Fed's Powell sounds down note

Technology and Internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

The S&P 500 index fell 27.97 points, or 1%, to 2,917.38. The Dow dropped 179.32 points, or 0.7%, to 26,548.22. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, slid 120.98 points, or 1.5%, to 7,884.72.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks gave up 9.05 points, or 0.6%, to 1,521.04.

The market is coming off its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark S&P 500 index is about 1.3% below the record high it set on Thursday.

In an early afternoon speech Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell noted that the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May amid uncertainty over trade and global growth. Earlier Tuesday, reports showed a decline in consumer confidence and more weakness in the housing market.

Powell said the Fed is reassessing its interest rate policy, though he did not commit to a rate cut. Separate comments from James Bullard, president of the Fed’s St. Louis regional bank, may have put a damper on the market’s expectations for big rate cut.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Bullard said a half-point rate cut — which many investors have been expecting — would be “overdone,” adding that a quarter-point cut would suffice to shield the economy from a slowdown.

“The risk is to the downside if they don’t cut [rates] when the markets are fully expecting it,” said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading & derivatives at Charles Schwab.

Read More Here...