The Nasdaq Now Dwarfs European Stock Market

Big Tech’s outperformance in 2020 has furthered its growth relative to a pan-European stock index.

The total market capitalization of the Nasdaq today is more than 40% larger than this broad European gauge, a feat not reached during the 2000-era tech bubble.

As relative gains of U.S. tech expands, investors should be asking themselves what a limit on that growth looks like.

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The Nasdaq Now Dwarfs European Stock Market

Big Tech’s outperformance in 2020 has furthered its growth relative to a pan-European stock index.

The total market capitalization of the Nasdaq today is more than 40% larger than this broad European gauge, a feat not reached during the 2000-era tech bubble.

As relative gains of U.S. tech expands, investors should be asking themselves what a limit on that growth looks like.

Read More Here...

Enerkon Solar Internaitonal (ENKS OTC PINK) – establishes a new Technology Holdings Division for New Patents

Enerkon Solar Internaitonal (ENKS OTC PINK) – establishes a new Technology Holdings Division for New Patents – NASDAQ News Today – EIN News

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Why August in a pandemic for stock-market investors is a time for vigilance

The dog day’s of summer on Wall Street are upon us.

The ancient Greeks would refer to the so-called “dog days” in late July and early August, as the period in which the star Sirius — also known as Alpha Canis Majoris, or dog star — appeared to rise before the sun as the hottest part of summer, one prone to bringing fever or catastrophe.

That description, perhaps, is an apt way to think about August markets in the midst of a pandemic that continues to dog investors, wreaking havoc on global economies.

“Historically August has had pretty muted performance…given the fluid coronavirus situation, the uncertainty regarding the timing of fiscal stimulus and signs of economic data stalling out, August could be more turbulent than it has in the past,” Lindsey Bell, chief strategist at Ally Invest told MarketWatch.

In fact, August has tended to be more prone to unexpected turbulence than its traditional reputation as a period in which traders and investors laze about before autumn trading action kicks off.

Last year, for example, the month began with President Donald Trump reigniting Sino-American trade tensions via a series of tweets that indicated that the U.S. would impose levies of 10% on China imports starting on Sept. 1. In 2017, a flare-up in tensions between North Korea and the U.S. drove the Cboe Volatility Index VIX, -1.21%, one measure of implied volatility in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, to its highest level to that point of the year.

China’s yuan CNYUSD, 0.00 CNHUSD, 0.00 devaluation and sluggish economy in 2015 helped to fuel the worst August performance in

Read More Here...

Why August in a pandemic for stock-market investors is a time for vigilance

The dog day’s of summer on Wall Street are upon us.

The ancient Greeks would refer to the so-called “dog days” in late July and early August, as the period in which the star Sirius — also known as Alpha Canis Majoris, or dog star — appeared to rise before the sun as the hottest part of summer, one prone to bringing fever or catastrophe.

That description, perhaps, is an apt way to think about August markets in the midst of a pandemic that continues to dog investors, wreaking havoc on global economies.

“Historically August has had pretty muted performance…given the fluid coronavirus situation, the uncertainty regarding the timing of fiscal stimulus and signs of economic data stalling out, August could be more turbulent than it has in the past,” Lindsey Bell, chief strategist at Ally Invest told MarketWatch.

In fact, August has tended to be more prone to unexpected turbulence than its traditional reputation as a period in which traders and investors laze about before autumn trading action kicks off.

Last year, for example, the month began with President Donald Trump reigniting Sino-American trade tensions via a series of tweets that indicated that the U.S. would impose levies of 10% on China imports starting on Sept. 1. In 2017, a flare-up in tensions between North Korea and the U.S. drove the Cboe Volatility Index VIX, -1.21%, one measure of implied volatility in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, to its highest level to that point of the year.

China’s yuan CNYUSD, 0.00 CNHUSD, 0.00 devaluation and sluggish economy in 2015 helped to fuel the worst August performance in

Read More Here...

Why August in a pandemic for stock-market investors is a time for vigilance

The dog day’s of summer on Wall Street are upon us.

The ancient Greeks would refer to the so-called “dog days” in late July and early August as the period in which the star Sirius — also known as Alpha Canis Majoris, or dog star–as the hottest part of summer, notably because the star appeared to rise just before the sun. It signified a time prone to bringing fever or catastrophe.

That description, perhaps, is an apt way to think about August markets in the midst of a pandemic that continues to dog investors, wreaking havoc on global economies.

“Historically August has had pretty muted performance…given the fluid coronavirus situation, the uncertainty regarding the timing of fiscal stimulus and signs of economic data stalling out, August could be more turbulent than it has in the past,” Lindsey Bell, chief strategist at Ally Invest told MarketWatch.

In fact, August has tended to be more prone to unexpected turbulence than its traditional reputation as a period in which traders and investors laze about before autumn trading action kicks off.

Last year, for example, the month began with President Donald Trump reigniting Sino-American trade tensions via a series of tweets that indicated that the U.S. would impose levies of 10% on China imports starting on Sept. 1. In 2017, a flare-up in tensions between North Korea and the U.S. drove the Cboe Volatility Index VIX, -1.21%, one measure of implied volatility in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, to its highest level to that point of the year.

China’s yuan CNYUSD, 0.00 CNHUSD, 0.00 devaluation and sluggish economy in 2015 helped to

Read More Here...

Why August in a pandemic for stock-market investors is a time for vigilance

The dog day’s of summer on Wall Street are upon us.

The ancient Greeks would refer to the so-called “dog days” in late July and early August, as the period in which the star Sirius — also known as Alpha Canis Majoris, or dog star — appeared to rise before the sun as the hottest part of summer, one prone to bringing fever or catastrophe.

That description, perhaps, is an apt way to think about August markets in the midst of a pandemic that continues to dog investors, wreaking havoc on global economies.

“Historically August has had pretty muted performance…given the fluid coronavirus situation, the uncertainty regarding the timing of fiscal stimulus and signs of economic data stalling out, August could be more turbulent than it has in the past,” Lindsey Bell, chief strategist at Ally Invest told MarketWatch.

In fact, August has tended to be more prone to unexpected turbulence than its traditional reputation as a period in which traders and investors laze about before autumn trading action kicks off.

Last year, for example, the month began with President Donald Trump reigniting Sino-American trade tensions via a series of tweets that indicated that the U.S. would impose levies of 10% on China imports starting on Sept. 1. In 2017, a flare-up in tensions between North Korea and the U.S. drove the Cboe Volatility Index VIX, -1.21%, one measure of implied volatility in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, to its highest level to that point of the year.

China’s yuan CNYUSD, 0.00 CNHUSD, 0.00 devaluation and sluggish economy in 2015 helped to fuel the worst August performance in

Read More Here...

Big Tech stocks are on the cusp of creating a setback for indexes

Mega-cap technology stocks have driven the Nasdaq and S&P 500 higher while, like a shiny veneer, they’ve masked broader stock market weakness.

But there’s reason to believe that the covering may soon come off as mega-caps turn into a liability for the broader market.

Here’s the 2020 performance (as of July 30) of mega-cap tech stocks compared with the Nasdaq-100 NDX, +1.77%, S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +0.43% and Russell 2000 RUT, -0.98%.

Facebook FB, +8.17% : +14.25%


Amazon AMZN, +3.69% : +65.16%


Apple AAPL, +10.46% : +31.03%


Microsoft MSFT, +0.54% : +29.30%


Netflix NFLX, +0.63% : +50.14%


Alphabet GOOGL, -3.27% : +14.86%

Nasdaq-100: +22.70%


S&P 500: -0.48%


Dow Jones Industrial Average: -7.80


Russell 2000: -10.39%

Indexes with the lowest exposure to mega-cap tech have performed the worst.

The chart below quantifies the dominance of mega-cap tech stocks. The black graph is an equal-weighted index of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Netflix, Alphabet — let’s call it the FAAMNG index. (The “G” stands for Alphabet unit Google.)

From the start of 2009, the FAAMNG index soared as much as 4,089%, while the Nasdaq-100 gained “only” 757%.

Mega-cap leadership has been long-term bullish. The zoomed-in

Read More Here...

Big Tech stocks are on the cusp of creating a setback for indexes

Mega-cap technology stocks have driven the Nasdaq and S&P 500 higher while, like a shiny veneer, they’ve masked broader stock market weakness.

But there’s reason to believe that the covering may soon come off as mega-caps turn into a liability for the broader market.

Here’s the 2020 performance (as of July 30) of mega-cap tech stocks compared with the Nasdaq-100 NDX, +1.77%, S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +0.43% and Russell 2000 RUT, -0.98%.

Facebook FB, +8.17% : +14.25%


Amazon AMZN, +3.69% : +65.16%


Apple AAPL, +10.46% : +31.03%


Microsoft MSFT, +0.54% : +29.30%


Netflix NFLX, +0.63% : +50.14%


Alphabet GOOGL, -3.27% : +14.86%

Nasdaq-100: +22.70%


S&P 500: -0.48%


Dow Jones Industrial Average: -7.80


Russell 2000: -10.39%

Indexes with the lowest exposure to mega-cap tech have performed the worst.

The chart below quantifies the dominance of mega-cap tech stocks. The black graph is an equal-weighted index of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Netflix, Alphabet — let’s call it the FAAMNG index. (The “G” stands for Alphabet unit Google.)

From the start of 2009, the FAAMNG index soared as much as 4,089%, while the Nasdaq-100 gained “only” 757%.

Mega-cap leadership has been long-term bullish. The zoomed-in

Read More Here...

Big Tech stocks are on the cusp of creating a setback for indexes

Mega-cap technology stocks have driven the Nasdaq and S&P 500 higher while, like a shiny veneer, they’ve masked broader stock market weakness.

But there’s reason to believe that the covering may soon come off as mega-caps turn into a liability for the broader market.

Here’s the 2020 performance (as of July 30) of mega-cap tech stocks compared with the Nasdaq-100 NDX, +1.77%, S&P 500 SPX, +0.76%, Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +0.43% and Russell 2000 RUT, -0.98%.

Facebook FB, +8.17% : +14.25%


Amazon AMZN, +3.69% : +65.16%


Apple AAPL, +10.46% : +31.03%


Microsoft MSFT, +0.54% : +29.30%


Netflix NFLX, +0.63% : +50.14%


Alphabet GOOGL, -3.27% : +14.86%

Nasdaq-100: +22.70%


S&P 500: -0.48%


Dow Jones Industrial Average: -7.80


Russell 2000: -10.39%

Indexes with the lowest exposure to mega-cap tech have performed the worst.

The chart below quantifies the dominance of mega-cap tech stocks. The black graph is an equal-weighted index of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Netflix, Alphabet — let’s call it the FAAMNG index. (The “G” stands for Alphabet unit Google.)

From the start of 2009, the FAAMNG index soared as much as 4,089%, while the Nasdaq-100 gained “only” 757%.

Mega-cap leadership has been long-term bullish. The zoomed-in

Read More Here...