3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Whether we’re in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market’s lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you’ll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and “analysis” from people who might have your email address … but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich,” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts … what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it’s true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it’s worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today’s events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you’re looking for a friendly voice … with great advice on how to make the most of your money … from a business with a lengthy track record of success … in clear, compelling language … I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It’s money to your ears.

 

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Whether we’re in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market’s lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you’ll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and “analysis” from people who might have your email address … but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich,” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts … what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it’s true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it’s worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today’s events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you’re looking for a friendly voice … with great advice on how to make the most of your money … from a business with a lengthy track record of success … in clear, compelling language … I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It’s money to your ears.

 

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Whether we’re in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market’s lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you’ll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and “analysis” from people who might have your email address … but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich,” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts … what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it’s true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it’s worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today’s events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you’re looking for a friendly voice … with great advice on how to make the most of your money … from a business with a lengthy track record of success … in clear, compelling language … I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It’s money to your ears.

 

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

To be perfectly clear, this is not a get-rich action that my Foolish colleagues and I came up with. But we wouldn’t argue with the approach.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

“The Motley Fool aims to build a strong investment community, which it does by providing a variety of resources: the website, books, a newspaper column, a radio [show], and [newsletters],” wrote (the clearly insightful and talented) money reporter Kathleen Elkins. “This site has something for every type of investor, from basic lessons for beginners to investing commentary on mutual funds, stock sectors, and value for the more advanced.”

Our mission at The Motley Fool is to help the world invest better, so it’s nice to receive that kind of recognition. It lets us know we’re doing our job.

Whether that’s helping the entirely uninitiated overcome their fear of stocks all the way to offering clear and successful guidance on complicated-sounding options trades, we want to provide our readers with a boost to the next step on their journey to financial independence.

Articles and beyond

As Business Insider wrote, there are a number of resources available from the Fool for investors of all levels and styles.

In addition to the dozens of free articles we publish every day on our website, I want to highlight two must-see spots in your tour of fool.com.

For the beginning investor

Investing can seem like a Big Deal to those who have yet to buy their first stock. Many investment professionals try to infuse the conversation with jargon in order to deter individual investors from tackling it on their own (and to justify their often sky-high fees).

But the individual investor can beat the market. The real secret to investing is that it doesn’t take tons of money, endless hours, or super-secret formulas that only experts possess.

That’s why we created a best-selling guide that walks investors-to-be through everything they need to know to get started. And because we’re so dedicated to our mission, we’ve made that available for free.

If you’re just starting out (or want to help out someone who is), go to www.fool.com/beginners, drop in your email address, and you’ll be able to instantly access the quick-read guide … for free.

For the listener

Whether it’s on the stationary exercise bike or during my daily commute, I spend a lot of time going nowhere. But I’ve found a way to make that time benefit me.

The Motley Fool offers five podcasts that I refer to as “binge-worthy financial information.”

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. It’s also featured on several dozen radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable … and I don’t say that simply because the hosts all sit within a Nerf-gun shot of my desk. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers contain timeless advice, so you might want to go back to the beginning with those. The other three take their cues from the market, so you’ll want to listen to the most recent first. All are available at www.fool.com/podcasts.

But wait, there’s more

The book and the podcasts – both free … both awesome – also come with an ongoing benefit. If you download the book, or if you enter your email address in the magical box at the podcasts page, you’ll get ongoing market coverage sent straight to your inbox.

Investor Insights is valuable and enjoyable coverage of everything from macroeconomic events to investing strategies to our analyst’s travels around the world to find the next big thing. Also free.

Get the book. Listen to a podcast. Sign up for Investor Insights. I’m not saying that any of those things will make you rich … but Business Insider seems to think so.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Whether we’re in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market’s lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you’ll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and “analysis” from people who might have your email address … but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich,” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts … what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it’s true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it’s worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today’s events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you’re looking for a friendly voice … with great advice on how to make the most of your money … from a business with a lengthy track record of success … in clear, compelling language … I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It’s money to your ears.

 

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Dow Jones Skyline
Image source: Dow Jones.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES:^DJI) is one of the most-followed stock market benchmarks in the world. Even those who don’t pay much attention to the investing world generally have a vague idea of the level of the Dow. Yet there are many things that even experienced investors don’t know about the Dow Jones averages and their history. Let’s take a look at three of them.

The Dow used to be a true average of a smaller number of stocks
Dow Jones first launched its Industrial Average in 1896. At the time, the Dow Industrials included just a dozen companies, and calculating the Dow was as simple as adding up all the share prices of the 12 stocks and then dividing the sum by 12. Of those 12 Dow stocks, only General Electric (NYSE:GE) has survived as a component of the Industrials to the present day.

Now, 120 years later, calculating the Dow is a bit more complicated. You can still add up the 30 share prices of the Dow’s components, but you then have to adjust the result to reflect the stock splits and other corporate reorganizations that have affected the Dow’s value over the decades. As of now, the Dow’s divisor is approximately 0.14602, meaning that for every $1 change in the price of a stock in the Dow, the average moves 6.85 points.

The Dow is more volatile than recent history would suggest
Many investors have been blindsided by the sizable volatility that the Dow Jones Industrial Average has undergone since last summer. Yet at least in terms of annual returns, substantial upward and downward moves are a norm for the average.

Over its history since 1897, the Dow has gained or lost more than 10% in 78 years. That leaves just 40 years in which the average has moved less than 10% within a year. That’s contrary to recent experience, in which four of the past five years have seen the Dow rise or fall by less than 10%, but it puts current turbulence in perspective.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average isn’t the most comprehensive Dow measure
Some investors are aware that the Dow isn’t the only average that Dow Jones tracks. In addition to the industrials — which include not only companies that most would consider to be true industrial stocks but also members of a wide range of other sectors of the business economy as well — separate Dow Jones Transportation (DJINDICES:DJT) and Dow Jones Utility (DJINDICES:^DJU) averages follow the moves in those sectors.

What few people know is that there’s a fourth Dow Jones average that combines these three averages into a broader measure of the overall market. The Dow Jones Composite consists of the 30 Dow Industrials stocks, the 20 Dow Jones Transportation average stocks, and the 15 Dow Jones Utility average stocks. These 65 stocks are all added together in one composite clump, and a separate average is calculated using the Composite average’s own divisor.

The Dow Jones Composite average currently trades at about 5,800, having peaked above 6,500 in late 2014. Putting the three averages together in this way arguably gives the transportation and utility sectors more weight than they deserve, but it nevertheless provides an interesting new perspective on the health of the broader stock market.

Just about everyone knows about the Dow Jones as a measure of the stock market’s strength. By knowing some of these lesser-known facts about the Dow, you can add some historical perspective to your investing strategies and be better able to handle the surprises that you’ll inevitably experience in your career as an investor.

The $15,978 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook
If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. In fact, one MarketWatch reporter argues that if more Americans knew about this, the government would have to shell out an extra $10 billion annually. For example: one easy, 17-minute trick could pay you as much as $15,978 more… each year! Once you learn how to take advantage of all these loopholes, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after. Simply click here to discover how you can take advantage of these strategies.

Dan Caplinger has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of General Electric Company. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

To be perfectly clear, this is not a get-rich action that my Foolish colleagues and I came up with. But we wouldn’t argue with the approach.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

“The Motley Fool aims to build a strong investment community, which it does by providing a variety of resources: the website, books, a newspaper column, a radio [show], and [newsletters],” wrote (the clearly insightful and talented) money reporter Kathleen Elkins. “This site has something for every type of investor, from basic lessons for beginners to investing commentary on mutual funds, stock sectors, and value for the more advanced.”

Our mission at The Motley Fool is to help the world invest better, so it’s nice to receive that kind of recognition. It lets us know we’re doing our job.

Whether that’s helping the entirely uninitiated overcome their fear of stocks all the way to offering clear and successful guidance on complicated-sounding options trades, we want to provide our readers with a boost to the next step on their journey to financial independence.

Articles and beyond

As Business Insider wrote, there are a number of resources available from the Fool for investors of all levels and styles.

In addition to the dozens of free articles we publish every day on our website, I want to highlight two must-see spots in your tour of fool.com.

For the beginning investor

Investing can seem like a Big Deal to those who have yet to buy their first stock. Many investment professionals try to infuse the conversation with jargon in order to deter individual investors from tackling it on their own (and to justify their often sky-high fees).

But the individual investor can beat the market. The real secret to investing is that it doesn’t take tons of money, endless hours, or super-secret formulas that only experts possess.

That’s why we created a best-selling guide that walks investors-to-be through everything they need to know to get started. And because we’re so dedicated to our mission, we’ve made that available for free.

If you’re just starting out (or want to help out someone who is), go to www.fool.com/beginners, drop in your email address, and you’ll be able to instantly access the quick-read guide … for free.

For the listener

Whether it’s on the stationary exercise bike or during my daily commute, I spend a lot of time going nowhere. But I’ve found a way to make that time benefit me.

The Motley Fool offers five podcasts that I refer to as “binge-worthy financial information.”

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. It’s also featured on several dozen radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable … and I don’t say that simply because the hosts all sit within a Nerf-gun shot of my desk. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers contain timeless advice, so you might want to go back to the beginning with those. The other three take their cues from the market, so you’ll want to listen to the most recent first. All are available at www.fool.com/podcasts.

But wait, there’s more

The book and the podcasts – both free … both awesome – also come with an ongoing benefit. If you download the book, or if you enter your email address in the magical box at the podcasts page, you’ll get ongoing market coverage sent straight to your inbox.

Investor Insights is valuable and enjoyable coverage of everything from macroeconomic events to investing strategies to our analyst’s travels around the world to find the next big thing. Also free.

Get the book. Listen to a podcast. Sign up for Investor Insights. I’m not saying that any of those things will make you rich … but Business Insider seems to think so.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Whether we’re in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market’s lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you’ll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and “analysis” from people who might have your email address … but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich,” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts … what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it’s true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it’s worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today’s events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you’re looking for a friendly voice … with great advice on how to make the most of your money … from a business with a lengthy track record of success … in clear, compelling language … I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It’s money to your ears.

 

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

Dow Jones Skyline
Image source: Dow Jones.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES:^DJI) is one of the most-followed stock market benchmarks in the world. Even those who don’t pay much attention to the investing world generally have a vague idea of the level of the Dow. Yet there are many things that even experienced investors don’t know about the Dow Jones averages and their history. Let’s take a look at three of them.

The Dow used to be a true average of a smaller number of stocks
Dow Jones first launched its Industrial Average in 1896. At the time, the Dow Industrials included just a dozen companies, and calculating the Dow was as simple as adding up all the share prices of the 12 stocks and then dividing the sum by 12. Of those 12 Dow stocks, only General Electric (NYSE:GE) has survived as a component of the Industrials to the present day.

Now, 120 years later, calculating the Dow is a bit more complicated. You can still add up the 30 share prices of the Dow’s components, but you then have to adjust the result to reflect the stock splits and other corporate reorganizations that have affected the Dow’s value over the decades. As of now, the Dow’s divisor is approximately 0.14602, meaning that for every $1 change in the price of a stock in the Dow, the average moves 6.85 points.

The Dow is more volatile than recent history would suggest
Many investors have been blindsided by the sizable volatility that the Dow Jones Industrial Average has undergone since last summer. Yet at least in terms of annual returns, substantial upward and downward moves are a norm for the average.

Over its history since 1897, the Dow has gained or lost more than 10% in 78 years. That leaves just 40 years in which the average has moved less than 10% within a year. That’s contrary to recent experience, in which four of the past five years have seen the Dow rise or fall by less than 10%, but it puts current turbulence in perspective.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average isn’t the most comprehensive Dow measure
Some investors are aware that the Dow isn’t the only average that Dow Jones tracks. In addition to the industrials — which include not only companies that most would consider to be true industrial stocks but also members of a wide range of other sectors of the business economy as well — separate Dow Jones Transportation (DJINDICES:DJT) and Dow Jones Utility (DJINDICES:^DJU) averages follow the moves in those sectors.

What few people know is that there’s a fourth Dow Jones average that combines these three averages into a broader measure of the overall market. The Dow Jones Composite consists of the 30 Dow Industrials stocks, the 20 Dow Jones Transportation average stocks, and the 15 Dow Jones Utility average stocks. These 65 stocks are all added together in one composite clump, and a separate average is calculated using the Composite average’s own divisor.

The Dow Jones Composite average currently trades at about 5,800, having peaked above 6,500 in late 2014. Putting the three averages together in this way arguably gives the transportation and utility sectors more weight than they deserve, but it nevertheless provides an interesting new perspective on the health of the broader stock market.

Just about everyone knows about the Dow Jones as a measure of the stock market’s strength. By knowing some of these lesser-known facts about the Dow, you can add some historical perspective to your investing strategies and be better able to handle the surprises that you’ll inevitably experience in your career as an investor.

The $15,978 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook
If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. In fact, one MarketWatch reporter argues that if more Americans knew about this, the government would have to shell out an extra $10 billion annually. For example: one easy, 17-minute trick could pay you as much as $15,978 more… each year! Once you learn how to take advantage of all these loopholes, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after. Simply click here to discover how you can take advantage of these strategies.

Dan Caplinger has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of General Electric Company. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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3 Facts You Didn't Know About the Dow Jones – Motley Fool

To be perfectly clear, this is not a get-rich action that my Foolish colleagues and I came up with. But we wouldn’t argue with the approach.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, “11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich” rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

“The Motley Fool aims to build a strong investment community, which it does by providing a variety of resources: the website, books, a newspaper column, a radio [show], and [newsletters],” wrote (the clearly insightful and talented) money reporter Kathleen Elkins. “This site has something for every type of investor, from basic lessons for beginners to investing commentary on mutual funds, stock sectors, and value for the more advanced.”

Our mission at The Motley Fool is to help the world invest better, so it’s nice to receive that kind of recognition. It lets us know we’re doing our job.

Whether that’s helping the entirely uninitiated overcome their fear of stocks all the way to offering clear and successful guidance on complicated-sounding options trades, we want to provide our readers with a boost to the next step on their journey to financial independence.

Articles and beyond

As Business Insider wrote, there are a number of resources available from the Fool for investors of all levels and styles.

In addition to the dozens of free articles we publish every day on our website, I want to highlight two must-see spots in your tour of fool.com.

For the beginning investor

Investing can seem like a Big Deal to those who have yet to buy their first stock. Many investment professionals try to infuse the conversation with jargon in order to deter individual investors from tackling it on their own (and to justify their often sky-high fees).

But the individual investor can beat the market. The real secret to investing is that it doesn’t take tons of money, endless hours, or super-secret formulas that only experts possess.

That’s why we created a best-selling guide that walks investors-to-be through everything they need to know to get started. And because we’re so dedicated to our mission, we’ve made that available for free.

If you’re just starting out (or want to help out someone who is), go to www.fool.com/beginners, drop in your email address, and you’ll be able to instantly access the quick-read guide … for free.

For the listener

Whether it’s on the stationary exercise bike or during my daily commute, I spend a lot of time going nowhere. But I’ve found a way to make that time benefit me.

The Motley Fool offers five podcasts that I refer to as “binge-worthy financial information.”

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week’s top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. It’s also featured on several dozen radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life’s biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he’s the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today’s most innovative and disruptive companies … and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They’re all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable … and I don’t say that simply because the hosts all sit within a Nerf-gun shot of my desk. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers contain timeless advice, so you might want to go back to the beginning with those. The other three take their cues from the market, so you’ll want to listen to the most recent first. All are available at www.fool.com/podcasts.

But wait, there’s more

The book and the podcasts – both free … both awesome – also come with an ongoing benefit. If you download the book, or if you enter your email address in the magical box at the podcasts page, you’ll get ongoing market coverage sent straight to your inbox.

Investor Insights is valuable and enjoyable coverage of everything from macroeconomic events to investing strategies to our analyst’s travels around the world to find the next big thing. Also free.

Get the book. Listen to a podcast. Sign up for Investor Insights. I’m not saying that any of those things will make you rich … but Business Insider seems to think so.

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