FBI Probing Dow Jones Hacking by Russians – Voice of America

U.S. authorities are reported to be investigating whether Russian hackers have infiltrated the Dow Jones financial news company to steal market-moving information prior to publication.   

The breach was “far more serious than a lower-grade intrusion” a year ago, Bloomberg News reports, citing sources.

There has been no reaction from the White House or the State Department. But Bloomberg reports the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Secret Service and the Securities and Exchange Commission are leading the investigation, which began at least a year ago.

However, a Dow Jones spokeswoman expressed skepticism about the Bloomberg report. “Since Bloomberg published its article, we have worked hard to establish whether the allegations it contains are correct. To date, we have been unable to find evidence of any such investigation,”  Dow Jones spokeswoman Colleen Schwartz said in an email.

But the FBI confirms it is looking into the hacking incident, though it did not comment on whether other U.S. government agencies are doing so as well.

Dow Jones, the publisher of the Wall Street Journal and a unit of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, disclosed last week a breach of its systems that put payment card and contact information of about 3,500 individuals at risk.

Bloomberg said the current hack is considered far more serious. The news agency said it was not clear if the two incidents were related.

Dow Jones had said that there was unauthorized access to its systems at certain times between August 2012 and July 2015.

Bloomberg said it was not clear if the information stolen included news stories, or embargoed financial data that had not yet been published.

“To the best of our knowledge, we have received no information from the authorities about any such alleged matter, and we are looking into whether there is any truth whatsoever to this report by a competitor news organization,” said Dow Jones as quoted by the French News Agency (AFP).

The case comes on the heels of numerous other hacking episodes involving sensitive market information. U.S. prosecutors in August brought charges against a pair of hackers in Ukraine who stole unpublished corporate press releases from online public relations services like Business Wire and sold them to people who traded shares on the information.

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Dow Jones denies report that it was hacked for trading tips – WMUR Manchester

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The owner of The Wall Street Journal denied a report on Friday from a rival news organization that hackers had infiltrated its servers to hunt for trading tips.

Bloomberg, citing unnamed sources, reported earlier on Friday that a breach of Dow Jones was led by Russian hackers who stole information to trade on.

Dow Jones, which owns the Journal, said it has received “no information” from authorities about “any such alleged matter.” The company added that it has “worked hard” to investigate the claims in the Bloomberg report but has been “unable to find any such investigation.”

The hackers were seeking sensitive information that included stories being prepared for publication, Bloomberg reported. The probe into the hack began at least a year ago, according to the report.

The FBI in New York is investigating a data breach of Dow Jones, FBI spokeswoman Kelly Langmesser said.

It was not clear who was responsible for the intrusion, according to a separate law enforcement official. The official said despite a media report that the information was stolen to be used for insider trading, investigators have not found evidence of that.

The Securities and Exchange Commission did not respond to a request for comment.

Dow Jones is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.

In theory, hackers could profit by buying or selling shares of companies to be featured prominently by Dow Jones publications, which include The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch.

For example, shares of a company painted in a negative light could tumble soon after a story is published.

On October 9, Dow Jones disclosed a cyberattack aimed at stealing contact and payment information on roughly 3,500 customers. The company has said it had no information that customer information was stolen and that it is working with law enforcement and a leading cybersecurity firm.

Earlier this year, U.S. authorities accused several individuals of hacking into the servers of news wire companies over a five-year period. They said these Russian-speaking hackers working from Ukraine reaped more than $100 million in gains by trading on unreleased earnings reports from companies like Oracle, Caterpillar and Boeing.

–CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz contributed to this report.

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Report: Russian hackers stole info from Dow Jones – USA TODAY

SAN FRANCISCO — Russian hackers penetrated servers at Dow Jones & Co. to steal information to make trades, Bloomberg reported Friday.

The FBI and Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating the infiltration, the news organization reported.

In a statement, Dow Jones & Co. said that since Bloomberg published its article, “we have worked hard to establish whether the allegations it contains are correct. To date, we have been unable to find evidence of any such investigation.”

Earlier this month Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. acknowledged that several of its publications, including The Wall Street Journal and Barron’s, had found evidence of hacks into their systems dating back to 2012.

USA TODAY

WSJ, Barrons hacked; CEO warns of wider plot

This type of targeted white collar hacking is on the rise, said Ken Westin, a senior security analyst for Tripwire, a Portland, Ore.-based security company.

“The goal of these intrusions is to target information that is valuable to traders or competitors. These kinds of intrusions can be pre-meditated — hackers are paid in advance by traders in order to gain access to certain types of data. They can also be opportunistic and the hacker(s) sell the data to traders or competitors after the fact. Embargoed data can have tremendous value in the right hands,” he said.

Follow USA TODAY tech reporter Elizabeth Weise on Twitter:@eweise

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Report: Russian hackers stole info from Dow Jones to make trades – USA TODAY

SAN FRANCISCO — Russian hackers penetrated servers at Dow Jones & Co. to steal information to make trades, Bloomberg reported Friday.

The FBI and Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating the infiltration, the news organization reported.

In a statement, Dow Jones & Co. said that since Bloomberg published its article, “we have worked hard to establish whether the allegations it contains are correct. To date, we have been unable to find evidence of any such investigation.”

Earlier this month Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. acknowledged that several of its publications, including The Wall Street Journal and Barron’s, had found evidence of hacks into their systems dating back to 2012.

USA TODAY

WSJ, Barrons hacked; CEO warns of wider plot

This type of targeted white collar hacking is on the rise, said Ken Westin, a senior security analyst for Tripwire, a Portland, Ore.-based security company.

“The goal of these intrusions is to target information that is valuable to traders or competitors. These kinds of intrusions can be pre-meditated — hackers are paid in advance by traders in order to gain access to certain types of data. They can also be opportunistic and the hacker(s) sell the data to traders or competitors after the fact. Embargoed data can have tremendous value in the right hands,” he said.

Follow USA TODAY tech reporter Elizabeth Weise on Twitter:@eweise

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/1LyCzXa

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Dow Jones denies it was hacked for trading tips – WKMG Orlando

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) –

The owner of The Wall Street Journal denied a report on Friday from a rival news organization that hackers had infiltrated its servers to hunt for trading tips.

Dow Jones, which owns the Journal, said it has received “no information” from authorities about “any such alleged matter.” Dow Jones said it is looking into whether there is “any truth whatsoever” to the report, noting that it originated from a “competitor news organization.”

Bloomberg, citing unnamed sources, reported earlier on Friday that a breach of Dow Jones was led by Russian hackers who stole information to trade on.

The hackers were seeking sensitive information that included stories being prepared for publication, Bloomberg reported. The probe into the hack began at least a year ago, according to the report.

The FBI in New York is investigating a data breach of Dow Jones, FBI spokeswoman Kelly Langmesser said.

It was not clear who was responsible for the intrusion, according to a separate law enforcement official. The official said despite a media report that the information was stolen to be used for insider trading, investigators have not found evidence of that.

The Securities and Exchange Commission did not respond to a request for comment.

Dow Jones is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.

In theory, hackers could profit by buying or selling shares of companies to be featured prominently by Dow Jones publications, which include The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch.

For example, shares of a company painted in a negative light could tumble soon after a story is published.

On October 9, Dow Jones disclosed a cyberattack aimed at stealing contact and payment information on roughly 3,500 customers. The company has said it had no information that customer information was stolen and that it is working with law enforcement and a leading cybersecurity firm.

Earlier this year, U.S. authorities accused several individuals of hacking into the servers of news wire companies over a five-year period. They said these Russian-speaking hackers working from Ukraine reaped more than $100 million in gains by trading on unreleased earnings reports from companies like Oracle, Caterpillar and Boeing.

–CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz contributed to this report.

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Report: Russians hacked Dow Jones for stock tips – Fortune

Russian hackers allegedly stole insider trading tips from Dow Jones in a cyberattack that occurred more than a year ago, Bloomberg reports.

The attackers apparently targeted the news organization, which owns The Wall Street Journal among other finance-focused publications, seeking potentially market-moving information before it was published. For example, reading an article about M&A negotiations before the rest of the world could enable a trader to buy a stock before its price surged—a significant (though illegal) advantage.

But it’s unclear whether the Russian group actually made any money off the theft: “The FBI and SEC have spent months trying to determine exactly how the hackers could profit from what they took,” according to the report, which cites unnamed sources.

And Dow Jones denied any knowledge of the attack (or the regulators’ investigation) implying in a statement that Bloomberg could have fabricated the news to make its rival media outlet look bad. “We are looking into whether there is any truth whatsoever to this report by a competitor news organization,” Dow Jones told Bloomberg.

The alleged breach is the latest example of a cyberattack seeking to obtain non-public information in order to gain a market advantage. In August, the SEC busted an insider trading ring that had made $100 million by working with hackers to get an early look at financial press releases, from which they gleaned illegal stock tips.

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Dow Jones servers breached by Russian ring: Report – CNBC

Dow Jones servers were infiltrated by a group of Russian hackers looking for stock tips, Bloomberg reported Friday.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s New York office confirmed to CNBC that it is aware of the hack and is investigating.

In a statement, Dow Jones said, “to the best of our knowledge, we have received no information from the authorities about any such alleged matter.”

“We are looking into whether there is any truth whatsoever to this report by a competitor news organization,” Dow Jones said.

The report describes the breach as more serious than the one reported last week, though it is still unclear if the two are related.

A Bloomberg spokesman said “we stand by our reporting.”

Last week, the News Corp. unit said that hackers had breached its system and possibly stole payment information for some former and current subscribers between August 2012 and July 2015.

Click here to read Bloomberg’s full report.

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Dow Jones Industrial Average Fluctuates As Wall Street Weighs The Federal … – International Business Times

U.S. stocks closed higher Friday after fluctuating during afternoon trading as investors weighed a series of mixed data and earnings reports, pointing to expectations the Federal Reserve will delay a rate hike this year. The likelihood of the Fed hiking borrowing costs before the end of 2015 diminished again this week after two top Fed officials came out strongly in favor of delaying a rate hike until next year, while mixed retail sales and inflation data triggered sizable downgrades to estimates of third-quarter gross domestic product growth.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (INDEXDJX:.DJI) added 74.22 points, or 0.43 percent, to close at 17,215.97. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index (INDEXSP:.INX) added 9.24 points, or 0.46 percent, to finish at 2,033.10. The Nasdaq composite (INDEXNASDAQ:.IXIC) rose 16.59 points, or 0.34 percent, to end at 4,886.69.

U.S. stocks closed higher for the third straight week, with the Dow adding 0.8 percent, or 133 points. The S&P 500 index added 0.9 percent, or 18 points and the Nasdaq rose 1.1 percent, or 56 points. 

Wall Street closed sharply higher a day earlier, with the blue-chip Dow leaping more than 200 points after William Dudley, the president of Federal Reserve Bank of New York, said recent data suggests the U.S. economy is slowing, pushing out market professionals’ expectations for the central bank to raise rates this year.

Capital Economics forecasts third-quarter U.S. GDP growth to come in at a 1.5 percent annualized pace, and overall growth for the year close to 2.4 percent.

“Our view is that the Fed will now wait until next year, most probably March,” Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, said in a research note Friday. However, the longer the Fed waits, the faster it will eventually need to hike rates to combat what could now be a very rapid rise in inflation next year, Ashworth warned.

Oxford Economics also trimmed the odds for December rate lift-off to 50 percent from 55 percent this week.

“Our base case remains that domestic momentum and gradually firming inflation will lead the Fed to lift rates in December. However, there is a real risk that the headwinds of weak global growth, the strong dollar, and lower oil prices will delay lift-off until next year,” Gregory Daco, head of U.S. macroeconomics at Oxford Economics, said in a note.

Dow Jones Industrial Average ($DJI) Stock Price – Trailing Year | FindTheCompany

Wall Street continued to eye third-quarter earnings season, an important measure as it provides an updated read on the pace of economic growth, both at home and abroad, as reflected by company releases.

“It is likely to impact near-term price swings of equities, impacting sentiment and perhaps weighing on the Fed’s looming rate lift-off date,” U.S. Bank Wealth Management said in its weekly Market & Economics report.

Shares of Dow component General Electric Company (NYSE:GE) gained more than 2 percent after the multinational conglomerate turned in quarterly earnings above Wall Street forecasts, while revenues fell short of estimates.

Seven of the 10 sectors in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index traded higher, led by a 1 percent gain in consumer staple stocks, while the energy sector was the largest laggard, down 0.5 percent.

The Dow Jones Transportation Average traded more than 1 percent lower, led by losses from regional U.S. railroad Kansas City Southern (NYSE:KSU), which sank 8.5 percent.

General Electric Company (GE) Stock Price – Current Day | FindTheCompany

U.S. consumer sentiment came in higher than expected in October, rising to a three-month high, signaling a rebound in confidence amid recent concerns of a slowing global economy.

The University of Michigan’s preliminary October reading came in at 92.1, higher than the previous month’s reading of 87.2. Experts were forecasting for the reading to come in at 89, according to analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

The rebound in the University of Michigan’s consumer confidence survey in October reflects the sharp decline in gasoline prices over the past month and the fading turmoil in stock markets.

Separately, a decline in industrial production in September suggests the impact the stronger U.S. dollar is having on manufacturing and the effects the slump in energy prices is having on mining output. Industrial output fell 0.2 percent after a revised 0.1 percent decline in August, the Federal Reserve said Friday.

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Dow Jones Industrial Average Today Ruled By China Weakness – Money Morning

Is Our Addiction to Cheap Money the Latest “Mania”?

More than a decade has passed since the dot-bomb implosion, and many of us are still amazed that so many investors got sucked into such an insane speculative financial mania.

And with U.S. stocks teetering at lofty levels – vaulted into their stratospheric space by the cheap-money policies of the U.S. Federal Reserve – it’s a story that’s worth looking at again.

Full Story

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Russian Hackers of Dow Jones Said to Have Sought Trading Tips – Bloomberg

A group of Russian hackers infiltrated the servers of Dow Jones & Co., owner of the Wall Street Journal and several other news publications, and stole information to trade on before it became public, according to four people familiar with the matter.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Secret Service and the Securities and Exchange Commission are leading an investigation of the infiltration, according to the people. The probe began at least a year ago, one of them said.

The breach is described by the people as far more serious than a lower-grade intrusion disclosed a week ago by Dow Jones, a unit of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. The company said last week that it was working with a cybersecurity firm and law enforcement after learning that hackers had sought contact and payment information of about 3,500 customers.

It is unclear if the incursions are related. It was also unclear whether the company’s newsgathering operations were affected in the insider-trading matter. Two of the people familiar with the investigation said the hackers sought information including stories being prepared for publication.

Information embargoed by companies and the government for release at a later time could be valuable to traders looking to gain an edge over other market participants, as could stories being prepared on topics like mergers and acquisitions that move stock prices.

Dow Jones publishes the Wall Street Journal and Barron’s and provides information through a number of services including Dow Jones Newswires. Bloomberg LP, the parent of Bloomberg News, competes with News Corp. in providing financial news and services.

Colleen Schwartz, a spokeswoman for Dow Jones, didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

Kelly Langmesser, a spokeswoman for the FBI New York office, confirmed the office is investigating a breach at Dow Jones but declined to comment further. Jim Margolin, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, declined to comment, as did spokesmen for the Secret Service and the SEC.

New Front

The hack investigation shows how quickly law enforcers are shifting to a new front in insider trading: cyberspace. Market-moving, nonpublic information used to trade hands in secret meetings. Hackers are now stealing sensitive information and selling it to traders. This new vulnerability in the financial markets is challenging law-enforcement officials who are trying to keep pace with cyber-criminals’ rapidly evolving moneymaking schemes.

For would-be inside traders, business journalists and data providers are a rich target. Potentially market-moving scoops often develop in-house for days or weeks, promising intruders a long pre-publication window to mine information and execute trades. Data being held for public release at a specified time can also be a gold mine in markets where the profitably of a trade is determined in a fraction of a second.

Dow Jones says in its annual report that its Factiva service provides global business content to about 1.1 million active users. “More than 4,000 sources make information available via Factiva on or before the date of publication by the source,” according to the report. Dow Jones Newswires publishes more than 16,000 news items each day to financial professionals and investors.

U.S. authorities are ramping up their pursuit of hackers after a series of high-profile attacks on corporations.

Hacking for Tips

In August, federal authorities made several arrests in what they called a years-long scheme that fused insider trading and hacking. In that matter, Russian-speaking hackers working from Ukraine were indicted along with traders for siphoning more than 150,000 press releases, including corporate earnings containing data that could be used to anticipate stock market moves, prosecutors said.

Those hackers broke into the servers of PRNewswire Association LLC, Marketwired and Business Wire, a unit of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc., over a five-year period, according to prosecutors. The group allegedly made more than $100 million in trades using unreleased earnings releases of companies such as Panera Bread Co., Boeing Co., Caterpillar Inc. and Oracle Corp., through retail brokerage accounts.

Information companies are regularly bombarded by hackers. When he disclosed the customer-data breach on Oct. 9, Dow Jones Chief Executive Officer William Lewis said the incursion was part of a “broader campaign involving a number of other victim companies.” Dow Jones learned of the hack from law enforcement officials, Lewis wrote, saying it had determined its system was breached at times between August 2012 to July 2015 by hackers whose goal appeared to be gathering contact information for customers so it could send them fraudulent solicitations. The company said it had no direct evidence that information was stolen.

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