How to Achieve and Maintain a Positive Mental Attitude? Author Veera Mahajan Explains

How to Achieve and Maintain a Positive Mental Attitude? Author Veera Mahajan Explains – Business News Today – EIN News

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This is the place where S&P 500 rallies may die

By Elena Popina and Reade Pickert

As hard as stocks plunged last quarter, their recovery in the New Year has been just as swift. A warning to S&P 500 bulls getting used to the upward trajectory: This is where rallies have fallen dead in the past.

While valuation makes a poor tool for market timing, there’s evidence its force becomes felt when the benchmark starts to approach 2,800. It’s 25 points from that level now, after vaulting 18 per cent since Christmas. More ominously for bulls is the sudden squishiness of 2019 profit estimates. It’s tough to fashion a case for more gains when the foundation keeps sagging.

Amid a winter of renewal, the question has lingered — when does shifting sentiment alone become too little to move the market? After all, an 8,000-point round trip in the Dow Jones Industrial Average has taken place since September with nary a ripple in readings on growth. At some point fundamentals will reassert themselves. Some say the time has arrived.

“You’re going to have to see the fundamentals support higher markets and those fundamentals are not great right now,” said Chris Gaffney, president of world markets at TIAA Bank in St. Louis. “It’s absolutely dangerous.”

While the S&P 500 advanced 2.5 per cent in the past five days to cap its seventh weekly gain in the past eight, the index’s next leg up would have it confront the round-number milestone that’s marked the demise of three prior rallies since October.

One explanation for the skittishness is valuation. If the S&P 500 tops 2,800, its valuation based on 2019 average per-share earnings estimates will be 16.5 times forward earnings — that’s the average reading over the past five years, demarcating a level at which some analysts say stocks become expensive.

Worse for bulls, earnings estimates continue to come down, tugging

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You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...

You've Got to Be High to Buy U.S. Marijuana Stocks

Illustration by Maria Corte

Beth Stavola feared she’d made a terrible investment mistake.

After having twins, the New Jersey mother of five took a break from her Wall Street career. In 2012, she heard of a business for sale in a small Arizona town. A visit impressed her enough to convince her husband that they should put about $1 million into a medical-marijuana venture.

“I didn’t know anything about growing, producing, dispensing,” Stavola recalls. So they found an experienced manager to run the operation, while she kept the books. But she says she soon noticed checks written for cash and a wedding dress charged to the business. With the help of a private eye, the Stavolas say, they found that the manager hadn’t come clean about his background—leaving out convictions for robbery conspiracy and other crimes.

When they fired him, she says he threatened her family. “It was scary. We were sick to our stomachs,” Beth Stavola says. “I was never in a world like that.”

Determined to salvage their stake, she took charge of the 47-acre pot farm. She opened her first dispensary in Douglas, Ariz., a few streets from where convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera once had a tunnel under the border with Mexico.

When two more dispensaries came up for sale, she bought them. By 2017, when her company was acquired for $25 million, it had expanded to Nevada, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. This month,the buyer, MPX Bioceutical, combined with another U.S. chain of marijuana outlets, iAnthus Capital Holdings (ticker: IAN.Canada), in exchange for stock worth about $600 million.

Stavola is staying on at iAnthus. She and her co-workers are now part

Read More Here...