These stocks suffered the biggest losses of the week – MarketWatch

Friday was another dismal day for U.S. stock investors, as the broad indexes suffered a third straight day of losses that, combined, topped 5%.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -2.24%  declined nearly 559 points, or 2.2%, on Friday to close out the week at 24,288.95, while the S&P 500 index SPX, -2.33%  was down 2.3% and the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP, -3.05%  fell 3.1%.

Here’s how all three indexes have performed over the past week and for all of 2018:

Index Price change – one week through Dec. 7 Price change – 2018 through Dec. 7 Dow Jones Industrial Average -4.5% -1.3% S&P 500 index -4.6% -1.5% Nasdaq Composite Index -4.9% 1.0% Source: FactSet

This was the worst week for the Dow since March, as investors continued to show concern over trade relations with China. The Labor Department’s “uninspiring” employment report for November showed a slowing of job creation, although the unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%.

Read: Tim Mullaney says now we know how much Trump’s trade war has cost your portfolio

All 30 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average were down for the week, with Caterpillar topping the list:

Company Ticker Price change – One week through Dec. 7 Price change – Dec. 7 Price change – 2018 through Dec. 3 Price change – 2017 Caterpillar Inc. CAT, -3.75% -8.9% -3.8% -21.6% 69.9% JPMorgan Chase & Co. JPM, -1.81% -7.1% -1.8% -3.4% 23.9% DowDuPont Inc. DWDP, -3.88%   -7.1% -3.9% -24.5% 24.5% Boeing Co. BA, -2.62% -6.8% -2.6% 9.6% 89.4% Intel Corp. INT, -1.24% -6.2% -4.4% 0.2% 27.3% Goldman Sachs Group Inc. GS, -2.40% -5.8% -2.4% -29.5% 6.4% Apple Inc. AAPL, -3.57% -5.7% -3.6% -0.4% 46.1% Microsoft Corp. MSFT, -4.00% -5.5% -4.0% 22.5% 37.7% Travelers Cos. Inc. TRV, -0.87% -5.2% -1.5% -8.9% 10.8% Pfizer Inc. PFE,

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Wall Street tumbles, indexes post biggest weekly losses since March

(Reuters) – Wall Street’s main indexes fell more than 2 percent on Friday in a broad sell-off led by declines in big Internet and technology shares, and posted their largest weekly percentage drops since March as concerns over U.S.-China trade tensions and interest rates convulsed Wall Street.

The S&P 500 erased virtually all of its gains from a week earlier, when the benchmark index notched its biggest weekly rise in seven years.

Following a weekend truce between Washington and Beijing in talks in Argentina, stocks have been volatile all week as investors comb through the news looking for signs of whether a trade-tension cloud over the stock market would dissipate.

Concerns over U.S.-China trade relations were fanned by White House trade adviser Peter Navarro’s comments that U.S. officials would raise tariff rates if the two countries could not come to an agreement during a 90-day negotiating period.

Along with trade, Wall Street has been focused on bond yields and the direction of interest rate policy from the Federal Reserve, with some investors expecting a slower pace of hikes than previously anticipated.

“It’s a crisis of confidence on the trade situation, what’s going to happen there, and maybe a little bit of a crisis of confidence in the Fed, given how quickly they have got to change their tune,” said Walter Todd, chief investment officer at Greenwood Capital Associates in Greenwood, South Carolina.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average .DJI fell 558.72 points, or 2.24 percent, to 24,388.95, the S&P 500 .SPX lost 62.87 points, or 2.33 percent, to 2,633.08 and the Nasdaq Composite .IXIC dropped 219.01 points, or 3.05 percent, to 6,969.25.

Technology shares tumbled, with the S&P 500 tech sector down 3.5 percent. Healthcare shares .SPXHC, the biggest gainer among major S&P sectors this year, dropped 2.5 percent.

The S&P

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US stock markets suffer worst week since March

Wall Street capped a turbulent week of trading Friday with the biggest weekly loss since March as traders fret over rising trade tensions between Washington and Beijing and signals of slower economic growth.

The latest wave of selling erased more than 550 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average, bringing its three-day loss to more than 1,400. For the week, major indexes are down more than 4 percent.

Worries that the testy U.S.-China trade dispute and higher interest rates will slow the economy has made investors uneasy, leading to volatile swings in the market from one day to the next.

On Monday, news that the U.S. and China had agreed to a 90-day truce in their escalating trade conflict drove stocks sharply higher, adding to strong gains the week before. The next day, as doubts mounted over the likelihood of a swift resolution to the trade dispute, stocks sank. On Friday, another early rally faded into another sharp drop.

“We’re in a market where investors just want to sell any upside that they see,” said Lindsey Bell, investment strategist at CFRA. “The volatility we’ve seen the last couple of weeks has been pretty extreme in both directions.”

The S&P 500 index fell 62.87 points, or 2.3 percent, to 2,633.08. The index has ended lower three out of the last four weeks. The Dow dropped 558.72 points, or 2.2 percent, to 24,388.95.

The Nasdaq composite slid 219.01 points, or 3 percent, to 6,969.25. The Russell 2000 index of small-company stocks gave up 29.32 points, or 2 percent, to 1,448.09.

The S&P 500 and Dow are now in the red for the year again. The Nasdaq was holding on to a modest gain.

Volatility has gripped the market since early October, reflecting investors’ worries that the Federal Reserve might overshoot with its

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A trillion-dollar swing in the stock market isn’t what it used to be

Stories on the stock market have been full of big numbers lately — especially big down numbers, like the 799 points the Dow dropped Tuesday, the 784 points it fell Thursday (before clawing back more than 700 of them) and the 559 points it fell Friday.

No, I can’t tell you where the market is going — would that I knew. But what I can do is help you put things in perspective. That’s important, because obsessing over big numerical swings (and the endless commentaries purporting to explain why stocks are rising or falling at a given moment) can make you more scared (or more upbeat) than you probably should be.

Let me explain, or try to explain.

In the past two months alone, the Dow has closed at least 500 points higher or lower no fewer than 11 times. On two of those days, the Wilshire 5000 total stock-market index has moved by a once unimaginable $1 trillion. That’s trillion, with a T. That’s how much the Wilshire fell on Tuesday.

But you know what, folks? Swings of 500 Dow points or a trillion dollars of market value ain’t what they used to be. How so? Because the stock market is so much higher than it once was.

Here’s the deal. The first time the Dow Jones industrial average, founded in 1896, had a 500-point move was on Oct. 19, 1987. The Dow’s 508-point drop that day was a terrifying 22.6 percent decline.

At Friday’s market close, such a move would be less than a tenth of that — a tad over 2 percent.

When the Wilshire, founded in 1974, had its first trillion-dollar one-day move on Sept. 29, 2008, its $1.2 trillion loss was an 8.3 percent drop.

These days, that would be about a 3.4 percent drop.

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Dow plunges for third straight day on weak jobs report and renewed trade tensions – NBCNews.com

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Dec. 7, 2018 / 9:10 PM GMT

By Lucy Bayly

The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped by 558 points on Friday, capping a wild week of trading that saw the blue-chip index lose close to 5 percent of its value. It was the worst week for the Dow since March, and erased all gains for the year.

The Dow started the day with a spike of 150 points after the Department of Labor released a generally tepid jobs report, only to plummet by mid-afternoon to a session low of 662 points down as markets continued to absorb the destabilizing impact of President Donald Trump’s protectionist trade policies.

The broader S&P 500 lost 2.3 percent of its value, and a tech sell-off fueled a drop of 3 percent on the Nasdaq composite index. Tech giants Alphabet and Apple both lost all of their gains for the year. Apple’s share price has been steadily falling after a litany of analysts cut their price targets for the smartphone maker amid concern over waning demand for the iPhone.

Dec. 7, 201802:28

The market also hiccuped after St. Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard suggested the central bank should not introduce a rate hike in December — the first to publicly make such a pronouncement. Bullard cited the inverted yield curve, a phenomenon that many see as indicative of an impending recession.

Even a production cut agreement by OPEC and an ensuing spike in oil prices failed to buoy markets. The oil cartel concluded its two-day meeting Friday with a deal — including non-member Russia — to curb output by a total of 1.2 million barrels

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Technology Companies Lead Slide in US Markets; Oil Rising

U.S. stocks fell sharply Friday, erasing an early gain, as the market closed in on its third weekly decline in four weeks.

Losses in technology and health care stocks outweighed gains elsewhere in the market. Energy companies led the gainers as crude oil prices rose on news that OPEC members agreed to cut production next year.

The government said job growth in November fell short of economists’ expectations.

Keeping score: The S&P 500 index fell 41 points, or 1.5 percent, to 2,654 as of 11:25 a.m. Eastern Time. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 411 points, or 1.7 percent, to 24,536. The Nasdaq composite slid 135 points, or 1.9 percent, to 7,053. The Russell 2000 index of small-company stocks slipped 4 points, or 0.3 percent, to 1,473.

Energy: Oil prices rose after OPEC countries agreed to reduce global oil production by 1.2 million barrels a day for six months, beginning in January. The move would include a reduction of 800,000 barrels per day from OPEC countries and 400,000 barrels per day from Russia and other non-OPEC nations. The news, which had been widely anticipated, pushed crude oil prices higher.

U.S. benchmark crude jumped 4.8 percent to $53.94 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 5.4 percent to $63.33 a barrel in London.

The pickup in oil prices sent energy stocks higher. Anadarko Petroleum gained 3.3 percent to $53.30.

Tech slide: A sell-off in technology stocks weighed on the market. Hewlett Packard Enterprise slumped 7.3 percent to $14.85.

Call a doctor: Health care sector stocks, the biggest gainer in the S&P 500 this year, took some of the heaviest losses. Cooper lost 7.8 percent to $255.12

Not so pretty: Ulta Beauty slid 9.6 percent to $264.74 after the cosmetics retailer’s latest quarterly report card

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Dire Indicators Signal a Stock Market Correction Is on the Way

iStock.com/Paperkites Stock Market at a Dangerous Crossroads

It has become increasingly frustrating to witness the resurfacing of selling capitulation in the stock market in what has so far been a hazardous year for bulls.

But while I’m not ready to throw in the towel and accept that the bulls are losing steam, I do feel the easy money in the stock market has already run its course.

We could see another year or so of upside moves in the stock market, but the increased macro uncertainties will surely make it difficult to not want to give in.

Here’s what is at stake at this time:

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China Deal or No Deal Yield Curve Inversion Tariff War

The stock market applauded after President Donald Trump and President Xi Jinping decided on a trade war ceasefire at the G20 meetings.

The problem is there was a lack of details on the actual agreement. Trump subsequently admitted there was no formal deal except a 90-day window for negotiations between the world’s two biggest economies.

….I am a Tariff Man. When people or countries come in to raid the great wealth of our Nation, I want them to pay for the privilege of doing so. It will always be the best way to max out our economic power. We are right now taking in $billions in Tariffs. MAKE AMERICA RICH AGAIN

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2018

Trump later referred to himself as a “Tariff Man” and the stock market grew despondent and threw up. The Dow cratered around 1,600 points on Tuesday, December 4 and its low point on Thursday, December 6. The Nasdaq broke below 7,000 intraday on Thursday.

Chart courtesy of StockCharts.com

But the tariffs don’t appear to be working as the U.S. trade deficit with

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Stock-market index futures pivot higher after jobs figures show signs of cooling

Futures for U.S. stock benchmarks on Friday turned decidedly higher after a key reading of domestic employment came in weaker than expected, at least on a headline basis. U.S. nonfarm payrolls increased a seasonally adjusted 155,000 last month, the Labor Department reported. The unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%, hanging near the lowest rate since 1969. Year-over-year wage growth matched the prior month’s 3.1% pace as the best rate since 2009. The data is a closely watched amid the Federal Reserve’s plan to normalize interest rates after the 2007-’09 financial crisis. Although some softness in the data following last month’s figures aren’t likely to dissuade the central bank from not lifting benchmark interest rates, currently at a range between 2% and 2.25%, a quarter-of-a-basis-point higher at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Dec. 19, it may give policy makers, led by Chairman Jerome Powell, some pause in increasing rates in 2019. Futures for the Dow Jones Industrial Average YMZ8, -1.90% were up 32 points, or 0.1%, at 24,937, those for the S&P 500 index ESZ8, -2.02% edged 0.1% up at 2,693, while those for the Nasdaq-100 NQZ8, -2.83% were flat at 6,823. All three index futures were trading lower prior to the report, after the Dow DJIA, -2.24% and S&P 500 SPX, -2.33% ended in negative territory on Thursday, while the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP, -3.05% produced a 0.4% gain, in a tumultuous session.

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Dow jumps more than 100 points as stocks attempt rally after lackluster jobs report, but weekly losses ahead

The Dow and the S&P 500 gained some altitude Friday morning–but benchmarks were on track for weekly losses–after a cooler-than-expected employment report. U.S. nonfarm payrolls increased a seasonally adjusted 155,000 last month, the Labor Department reported. The unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%, hanging near the lowest rate since 1969. Year-over-year wage growth matched the prior month’s 3.1% pace as the best rate since 2009. The data are closely watched amid the Federal Reserve’s plan to normalize interest rates, with its coming rate-setting meeting scheduled for Dec. 18-19. Although some softness in the data following last month’s figures aren’t likely to prevent the Fed from lifting benchmark interest rates, currently at a range between 2% and 2.25%, a quarter-of-a-basis-point later this month, there are signs that policy makers may take a more conservative tack in 2019. The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -2.24% was trading 0.4% higher at 25,055, those for the S&P 500 index SPX, -2.33% edged 0.4% higher at 2,705, while the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP, -3.05% rose 0.1% at 7,196. For the week, the Dow is set for a loss of 1.9%, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq are on track to produce a weekly loss of about 2%. In corporate news, shares of Big Lots Inc. BIG, -23.08% were sharply lower after the discount retailer reported disappointing third-quarter results and lowered its full-year guidance. Investors also have been closely watching a meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia, which reached an agreement in Vienna to cut crude-oil output, delivering a jolt to crude-oil prices CLF9, +1.24% and the energy sector.

See Full Story Dow closes down 550 points as stocks post biggest weekly fall since March

U.S. stocks deepened their losses Friday as new jitters on trade

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Dow falls by about 400 points as stock market takes a fresh leg lower late-morning Friday

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was trading near session lows late-morning Friday, with investors focusing on nagging worries on trade relations between the U.S. and China. The Dow DJIA, -2.24% most recently was down 391 points, or 1.6%, at 24,549, the S&P 500 index SPX, -2.33% traded 1.5% lower at 2,656, while the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP, -3.05% retreated 1.9% at 7,052. The moves follow a jobs report that showed that 155,000 jobs were created in November, while the unemployment rate remained at the 3.7%, the lowest since 1969. For the week, the Dow is set to drop 3.9%, the S&P 500 is on track for a 3.8% decline, while the Nasdaq is poised for a weekly drop of 3.7%.

See Full Story Dow closes down 550 points as stocks post biggest weekly fall since March

U.S. stocks deepened their losses Friday as new jitters on trade relations overshadow the November employment report.

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